Pheochromocytoma physical examination

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Pheochromocytoma Microchapters

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmad Al Maradni, M.D. [2] Mohammed Abdelwahed M.D[3]

Overview

Common physical exam findings of pheochromocytoma include tachycardia, hypertension, and orthostatic hypotension.

Physical Examination

Appearance of the Patient

Vital Signs

Skin

Head

Neck

Lungs

Heart

Abdomen

Back

References

  1. Bravo EL, Gifford RW (1993). "Pheochromocytoma.". Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 22 (2): 329–41. PMID 8325290. 
  2. Drénou B, Le Tulzo Y, Caulet-Maugendre S, Le Guerrier A, Leclercq C, Guilhem I; et al. (1995). "Pheochromocytoma and secondary erythrocytosis: role of tumour erythropoietin secretion.". Nouv Rev Fr Hematol. 37 (3): 197–9. PMID 7567437. 
  3. La Batide-Alanore A, Chatellier G, Plouin PF (2003). "Diabetes as a marker of pheochromocytoma in hypertensive patients.". J Hypertens. 21 (9): 1703–7. PMID 12923403. doi:10.1097/01.hjh.0000084729.53355.ce. 
  4. Kassim TA, Clarke DD, Mai VQ, Clyde PW, Mohamed Shakir KM (2008). "Catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.". Endocr Pract. 14 (9): 1137–49. PMID 19158054. doi:10.4158/EP.14.9.1137. 
  5. HEINRICH WA, JUDD ES (1948). "A critical analysis of biopsy of lymph nodes.". Proc Staff Meet Mayo Clin. 23 (21): 465–9. PMID 18888946. 
  6. Wells SA, Asa SL, Dralle H, Elisei R, Evans DB, Gagel RF; et al. (2015). "Revised American Thyroid Association guidelines for the management of medullary thyroid carcinoma.". Thyroid. 25 (6): 567–610. PMC 4490627Freely accessible. PMID 25810047. doi:10.1089/thy.2014.0335. 
  7. O'Riordain DS, O'Brien T, Crotty TB, Gharib H, Grant CS, van Heerden JA (1995). "Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B: more than an endocrine disorder.". Surgery. 118 (6): 936–42. PMID 7491537. 
  8. Wells SA, Asa SL, Dralle H, Elisei R, Evans DB, Gagel RF; et al. (2015). "Revised American Thyroid Association guidelines for the management of medullary thyroid carcinoma.". Thyroid. 25 (6): 567–610. PMC 4490627Freely accessible. PMID 25810047. doi:10.1089/thy.2014.0335. 

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