Pheochromocytoma classification

Jump to: navigation, search

Pheochromocytoma Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Pheochromocytoma from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X Ray

CT

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Pheochromocytoma classification On the Web

Most recent articles

cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Pheochromocytoma classification

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Pheochromocytoma classification

CDC on Pheochromocytoma classification

Pheochromocytoma classification in the news

Blogs on Pheochromocytoma classification

Directions to Hospitals Treating Pheochromocytoma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Pheochromocytoma classification

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmad Al Maradni, M.D. [2] Mohammed Abdelwahed M.D[3]

Overview

Pheochromocytoma may be classified based on nature of the tumor into benign and malignant. Pheochromocytoma can also be classified based on the spread into local, regional, and metastatic. Another classification based on origin, divides pheochromocytoma into familial, non-familial and sporadic forms.

Classification

Classification based on nature of tumor:

Classification based on spread:

Classification based on genetics:

Familial pheochromocytoma

Non-familial pheochromocytoma:

Sporadic:

  • Most catecholamine-secreting tumors are sporadic. Mutations have been identified in most of the sporadic cases.

References

  1. Travis WD, Brambilla E, Nicholson AG, Yatabe Y, Austin JH, Beasley MB; et al. (2015). "The 2015 World Health Organization Classification of Lung Tumors: Impact of Genetic, Clinical and Radiologic Advances Since the 2004 Classification.". J Thorac Oncol. 10 (9): 1243–60. PMID 26291008. doi:10.1097/JTO.0000000000000630. 
  2. Buffet A, Venisse A, Nau V, Roncellin I, Boccio V, Le Pottier N; et al. (2012). "A decade (2001-2010) of genetic testing for pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma.". Horm Metab Res. 44 (5): 359–66. PMID 22517557. doi:10.1055/s-0032-1304594. 
  3. Jafri M, Whitworth J, Rattenberry E, Vialard L, Kilby G, Kumar AV; et al. (2013). "Evaluation of SDHB, SDHD and VHL gene susceptibility testing in the assessment of individuals with non-syndromic phaeochromocytoma, paraganglioma and head and neck paraganglioma.". Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 78 (6): 898–906. PMID 23072324. doi:10.1111/cen.12074. 

Linked-in.jpg