Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics

Jump to: navigation, search

Pheochromocytoma Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Pheochromocytoma from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X Ray

CT

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics On the Web

Most recent articles

cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics

CDC on Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics

Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics in the news

Blogs on Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics</small>

Directions to Hospitals Treating Pheochromocytoma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Pheochromocytoma epidemiology and demographics

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmad Al Maradni, M.D. [2]Mohammed Abdelwahed M.D[3]

Overview

The incidence of pheochromocytoma ranges from a low of 0.2 per 100,000 persons to as high as 0.8 per 100,000 persons. The average age at diagnosis is 24.9 years in familial cases and 43.9 years in sporadic cases. Both men and women are affected equally by pheochromocytoma.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence

  • In the USA, the incidence of pheochromocytoma ranges from a low of 0.2 per 100,000 persons to a high of 0.8 per 100,000 persons.[1].
  • Annually reported cases range from 500 to 1600 in the United States.[2]
  • Autopsy studies have discovered a higher number of cases than the actual prevalence rates. Ten percent of pheochromocytomas cases are discovered by chance. 

Prevalence

  • The prevalence of pheochromocytoma in patients with hypertension in general outpatient clinics varies between 0.2 and 0.6%.
  • The prevalence of pheochromocytoma is approximately 1.7% in children with hypertension.
  • About 5% of patients with incidentally discovered adrenal masses on imaging actually have pheochromocytoma.
  • The prevalence of pheochromocytoma in individuals carrying a germline mutation in pheochromocytoma susceptibility genes may be around 50%.
  • Patients with hereditary pheochromocytoma typically present with multifocal disease and at a younger age than those with sporadic neoplasms.

Age

  • The peak incidence of pheochromocytoma occurs in third decades of life; the average age at diagnosis is 24.9 years in hereditary cases and 43.9 years in sporadic cases.[1]
  • Hereditary tumors present at a younger age than sporadic.
  • Approximately 10% occur in children.

Race

  • Pheochromocytomas occur across all races but is found less commonly in blacks.

Gender

  • Both men and women are affected equally by pheochromocytoma.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 National Cancer Institute. Physician Data Query Database 2015. National Cancer Institute. Physician Data Query Database 2015. http://www.cancer.gov/types/pheochromocytoma/hp/pheochromocytoma-treatment-pdq#link/_25_toc
  2. Chen H, Sippel RS, O'Dorisio MS, Vinik AI, Lloyd RV, Pacak K; et al. (2010). "The North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Society consensus guideline for the diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine tumors: pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma, and medullary thyroid cancer.". Pancreas. 39 (6): 775–83. PMC 3419007Freely accessible. PMID 20664475. doi:10.1097/MPA.0b013e3181ebb4f0. 

Linked-in.jpg