Pheochromocytoma echocardiography or ultrasound

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

A pheochromocytoma (phaeochromocytoma outside of the US) is a neuroendocrine tumor of the medulla of the adrenal glands (originating in the chromaffin cells) or extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue which failed to involute after birth,[1] which secretes excessive amounts of catecholamines, usually epinephrine and norepinephrine. Extra-adrenal paragangliomas (often described as extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas) are closely related, though less common, tumors that originate in the ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system and are named based upon the primary anatomical site of origin.

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

References

  1. Boulpaep, Emile L.; Boron, Walter F. (2003). Medical physiology: a cellular and molecular approach. Philadelphia: Saunders. p. 1065. ISBN 0-7216-3256-4. 

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