Acute tubular necrosis natural history, complications and prognosis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Chandrakala Yannam, MD [2]

Overview

Acute tubular necrosis may usually develop through 3 phases, initiation, maintenance and recovery. Common complications of acute tubular necrosis include electrolyte imbalance(eg, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, and metabolic acidosis), platelet dysfunction, uremia, and altered consciousness or coma. Prognosis depends on the underlying etiology and severity of kidney damage. When compared to ischemic acute tubular necrosis, nephrotoxic and mixed acute tubular necrosis have the good prognosis.

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Natural History

Complications

Prognosis


References

  1. Ramoutar V, Landa C, James LR (August 2014). "Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) presenting with an unusually prolonged period of marked polyuria heralded by an abrupt oliguric phase". BMJ Case Rep. 2014. doi:10.1136/bcr-2013-201030. PMC 4154042. PMID 25150229.
  2. Santos WJ, Zanetta DM, Pires AC, Lobo SM, Lima EQ, Burdmann EA (2006). "Patients with ischaemic, mixed and nephrotoxic acute tubular necrosis in the intensive care unit--a homogeneous population?". Crit Care. 10 (2): R68. doi:10.1186/cc4904. PMC 1550879. PMID 16646986.
  3. Liaño F, Gallego A, Pascual J, García-Martín F, Teruel JL, Marcén R, Orofino L, Orte L, Rivera M, Gallego N (1993). "Prognosis of acute tubular necrosis: an extended prospectively contrasted study". Nephron. 63 (1): 21–31. doi:10.1159/000187139. PMID 8446248.
  4. Weisberg LS, Allgren RL, Genter FC, Kurnik BR (September 1997). "Cause of acute tubular necrosis affects its prognosis. The Auriculin Anaritide Acute Renal Failure Study Group". Arch. Intern. Med. 157 (16): 1833–8. PMID 9290542.
  5. Esson ML, Schrier RW (November 2002). "Diagnosis and treatment of acute tubular necrosis". Ann. Intern. Med. 137 (9): 744–52. PMID 12416948.

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