Acute tubular necrosis physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Chandrakala Yannam, MD [2]

Overview

On physical examination, patients with acute tubular necrosis may show the findings of volume depletion. They usually appear ill, dehydrated, and lethargic. Common physical examination findings of acute tubular necrosis include orthostatic hypotension and other signs of hypovolemia (dry mucous membranes, sunken eyes, poor skin turgor and delayed capillary refill, and decreased jugular venous pressure).

Physical Examination[1][2]

Appearance of the Patient

Vital Signs

Skin

Skin examination of patients with acute tubular necrosis may show following findings:

HEENT

Lungs

Heart

Abdomen

Abdominal examination of patients with acute tubular necrosis may show following findings:

Neuromuscular

Extremities

References

  1. Anderson RJ, Barry DW (March 2004). "Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of acute renal failure". Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol. 18 (1): 1–20. PMID 14760871.
  2. Himmelfarb J, Joannidis M, Molitoris B, Schietz M, Okusa MD, Warnock D, Laghi F, Goldstein SL, Prielipp R, Parikh CR, Pannu N, Lobo SM, Shah S, D'Intini V, Kellum JA (July 2008). "Evaluation and initial management of acute kidney injury". Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 3 (4): 962–7. doi:10.2215/CJN.04971107. PMC 2440262. PMID 18354074.

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