Stomach cancer classification

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Omer Kamal, M.D.[2], Parminder Dhingra, M.D. [3], Mohammed Abdelwahed M.D[4]

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Overview

Gastric cancer can be classified according to the Padova classification system based upon the grade of metaplasia, dysplasia and invasiveness of the disease. It may also be classified according to the Japanese classification system based on the type of lesions (benign or malignant) and atypia.

Classification

Gastric cancer can be classified according to the Padova classification system based upon the grade of metaplasia, dysplasia and invasiveness of the disease. It may also be classified according to the Japanese classification system based on the type of lesions (benign or malignant) and atypia. The following tables briefly outline the major classification systems:[1][2]

Padova classification

1. Negative for dysplasia
1.0 Normal
1.1 Reactive foveolar hyperplasia
1.2 Intestinal metaplasia (IM)
1.2.1 IM Complete type
1.2.2 IM Incomplete type
2. Indefinite for dysplasia
2.1 Foveolar hyperproliferation
2.2 Hyperproliferative IM
3. Non-invasive neoplasia (flat or elevated [synonym adenoma])
3.1 Low-grade
3.2 High-grade
3.2.1 Including suspicious for carcinoma without invasion (interglandular)
3.2.2 Including carcinoma without invasion (intraglandular)
4. Suspicious for invasive carcinoma
5. Invasive adenocarcinoma

Japanese classification

Category Definition
Group I Normal mucosa and benign lesions with no atypia
Group II Lesions showing atypia but diagnosed as benign (non-neoplastic)
Group III Borderline lesions between benign and malignant
Group V Lesions strongly suspected of carcinoma
Group V Carcinoma

References

  1. Rugge M, Correa P, Dixon MF, Hattori T, Leandro G, Lewin K; et al. (2000). "Gastric dysplasia: the Padova international classification". Am J Surg Pathol. 24 (2): 167–76. PMID 10680883.
  2. Japanese Gastric Cancer Association (2017). "Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines 2014 (ver. 4)". Gastric Cancer. 20 (1): 1–19. doi:10.1007/s10120-016-0622-4. PMC 5215069. PMID 27342689.



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