Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis

Jump to: navigation, search

Acoustic neuroma Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Acoustic neuroma from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Staging

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

MRI

CT

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis On the Web

Most recent articles

cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis

CDC on Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis

Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis in the news

Blogs on Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis

Directions to Hospitals Treating Acoustic neuroma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Acoustic neuroma natural history, complications & prognosis

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Simrat Sarai, M.D. [2]Sabawoon Mirwais, M.B.B.S.[3]

Overview

Approximately 50% of all acoustic neuromas grow slowly (1 - 2 mm/year). The growth rate is more rapid (greater than 2 mm/year) in about 20% of the patients. The tumor does not metastasize to other parts of the body. Hearing loss, when occurs, is irreversible. If left untreated, an acoustic neuroma can block the flow of cerebrospinal fluid and cause hydrocephalus, which may lead to severe vision problems and difficulty breathing and swallowing. Complications of acoustic neuroma include hearing loss, Hydrocephalus, and recurrence of the tumor. Small, slow-growing tumors may not need treatment. Patients experience similar quality of life whether treatment is observation, radiation, or surgery.

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Natural History

Complications

Complications of acoustic neuroma include:[4]

Prognosis

References

  1. S. I. Rosenberg (2000). "Natural history of acoustic neuromas". The Laryngoscope. 110 (4): 497–508. doi:10.1097/00005537-200004000-00002. PMID 10763994. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  2. B. Strasnick, M. E. 3rd Glasscock, D. Haynes, S. O. McMenomey & L. B. Minor (1994). "The natural history of untreated acoustic neuromas". The Laryngoscope. 104 (9): 1115–1119. doi:10.1288/00005537-199409000-00011. PMID 8072358. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  3. {{Cite journal | author = Sven-Eric Stangerup, Per Caye-Thomasen, Mirko Tos & Jens Thomsen | title = The natural history of vestibular schwannoma | journal = [[Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology]] | volume = 27 | issue = 4 | pages = 547–552 | year = 2006 | month = June | doi = 10.1097/01.mao.0000217356.73463.e7 | pmid = 16791048 }}
  4. 4.0 4.1 Acoustic neuroma. NHS(2014) http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Acoustic-neuroma/Pages/Complications.aspx Accessed on October 2 2015
  5. "NIH acoustic neuroma Prognosis".
  6. Strasnick B, Glasscock ME, Haynes D, McMenomey SO, Minor LB (1994). "The natural history of untreated acoustic neuromas". Laryngoscope. 104 (9): 1115–9. doi:10.1288/00005537-199409000-00011. PMID 8072358.

Linked-in.jpg