African trypanosomiasis risk factors

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African trypanosomiasis Microchapters

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aditya Ganti M.B.B.S. [2]

Overview

Risk factors for African trypanosomiasis include residence in Central or South America, living in old houses with mud and stick wall constructions or straw roofs, ingestion of contaminated water, or receiving blood transfusions or organ donation from individuals in regions with high endemicity. The risk of infection increases with the number of times a person is bitten by the tsetse fly. The neonatal risk is highest among those who breastfeed from bleeding or cracked nipples of infected mothers and infants who are delivered from seropositive mothers with active disease.

Risk Factors

Common risk factors in the development of African trypanosomiasis include:[1]

In addition to the bite of the tsetse fly, the disease is contractible in the following ways:

References


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