African trypanosomiasis classification

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aditya Ganti M.B.B.S. [2]

Overview

African trypanosomiasis can be classified based upon the pathogen and geographic location into two types, East African trypanosomiasis and West African trypanosomiasis.

Classification

African trypanosomiasis can be classified based upon the pathogen and geographic location into the following types:[1]

Disease Pathogen Geographic

distribution

Progression Symptoms
First stage Second stage
East African sleeping sickness Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense East and Southeast Africa Rapid

(1-2 weeks)

West African sleeping sickness Trypanosoma brucei gambiense West and Central Africa Slow

(1-2 years)

  • Personality changes
  • Daytime sleepiness with night time sleep disturbance
  • Progressive confusion
  • Partial paralysis or problems with balance or walking may occur
  • Hormonal imbalances
  • The course of untreated infection rarely lasts longer than 6-7 years and more often kills in about 3 years.

References

  1. Picozzi K, Fèvre EM, Odiit M, Carrington M, Eisler MC, Maudlin I, Welburn SC (2005). "Sleeping sickness in Uganda: a thin line between two fatal diseases". BMJ. 331 (7527): 1238–41. doi:10.1136/bmj.331.7527.1238. PMC 1289320. PMID 16308383.

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