Adenocarcinoma of the lung epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Shanshan Cen, M.D. [2]

Overview

The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is approximately 22.1 per 100,000 individuals worldwide.[1] Adenocarcinoma of the lung affects men and women equally. Patients of all age groups may develop adenocarcinoma of the lung.[2]

Epidemiology and Demographics

Prevalence

  • Adenocarcinoma of the lung is now considered the most common histological subtypes of lung cancer.[1]
  • Nearly 40% of lung cancers in the US are adenocarcinoma.
  • Among people who have smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes in their lifetimes, adenocarcinoma is the most common form of lung cancer.
  • To view more epidemiological information among patients of lung cancer, please click Here.

Incidence

  • The age-adjusted incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is approximately 22.1 per 100,000 individuals worldwide.[1]

Gender

  • Adenocarcinoma of the lung affects men and women equally.[2]

Age

  • Patients of all age groups may develop adenocarcinoma of the lung.[2]

Developed Countries

  • The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung has been increasing in many developed Western nations in the past few decades, where it has become the most common major type of lung cancer in smokers (replacing squamous cell carcinoma of the lung) and in lifelong nonsmokers.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Adenocarcinoma of the lung. Wikipedia 2015. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adenocarcinoma_of_the_lung#Epidemiology
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Paris C, Clement-Duchene C, Vignaud JM, Gislard A, Stoufflet A, Bertrand O; et al. (2010). "Relationships between lung adenocarcinoma and gender, age, smoking and occupational risk factors: A case-case study.". Lung Cancer. 68 (2): 146–53. PMID 19586681. doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2009.06.007. 

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