Adenocarcinoma of the lung causes

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Shanshan Cen, M.D. [2]

Overview

Adenocarcinoma of the lung may caused by genetic mutations, including EGFR (7p11), KRAS (12p12), BRAF (7q34), and PIK3CA (3q26).[1]

Causes

  • Genes involved in the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma of the lung include:[2][3][4]
  • EGFR (7p11)
  • KRAS (12p12)
  • BRAF (7q34)
  • PIK3CA (3q26)
  • ERBB2 (17q12)
  • Translocation EML4/ALK
  • Tyrosine kinase fusions

References

  1. Stewart, Bernard (2014). World cancer report 2014. Lyon, France Geneva, Switzerland: International Agency for Research on Cancer,Distributed by WHO Press, World Health Organization. ISBN 9283204298. 
  2. Stewart, Bernard (2014). World cancer report 2014. Lyon, France Geneva, Switzerland: International Agency for Research on Cancer,Distributed by WHO Press, World Health Organization. ISBN 9283204298. 
  3. Soda M, Choi YL, Enomoto M, Takada S, Yamashita Y, Ishikawa S; et al. (2007). "Identification of the transforming EML4-ALK fusion gene in non-small-cell lung cancer.". Nature. 448 (7153): 561–6. PMID 17625570. doi:10.1038/nature05945. 
  4. Davies KD, Le AT, Theodoro MF, Skokan MC, Aisner DL, Berge EM; et al. (2012). "Identifying and targeting ROS1 gene fusions in non-small cell lung cancer.". Clin Cancer Res. 18 (17): 4570–9. PMC 3703205Freely accessible. PMID 22919003. doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-0550. 

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