Sudden infant death syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Vamsikrishna Gunnam M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Common complications of SIDS include sudden unexplained death. Depending on the risk factors for recurrence, the prognosis may vary for SIDS. SIDS is typically unexplained death during without any prior symptoms.

Natural History, Complications, and Prognosis

Natural History

  • The symptoms of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) usually develop in between one month and one year of age in the United States.[1]
  • SIDS is typically unexplained death during without any prior symptoms.

Complications

  • Common complications of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) include:[2][3]
    • Women whose infants die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) are highly likely to have complications in their following pregnancies with the following:
      • Placenta previa
      • Abruptio placenta
      • Premature rupture of membranes

Prognosis

  • Depending on the risk factors for recurrence, the prognosis may vary for SIDS, which include apparent life-threatening events (ALTE).[4][5][6][7][8]
  • History of multiple events preceding the hospital admission, and infections that are viral in nature also play a important role in determining the prognosis in SIDS victims.

References

  1. Ndu IK (2016). "Sudden infant death syndrome: an unrecognized killer in developing countries". Pediatric Health Med Ther. 7: 1–4. doi:10.2147/PHMT.S99685. PMC 5683278. PMID 29388586.
  2. Smith GC, Wood AM, Pell JP, Dobbie R (2005). "Sudden infant death syndrome and complications in other pregnancies". Lancet. 366 (9503): 2107–11. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67888-9. PMID 16360787.
  3. Smith, Gordon CS; Wood, Angela M; Pell, Jill P; Dobbie, Richard (2005). "Sudden infant death syndrome and complications in other pregnancies". The Lancet. 366 (9503): 2107–2111. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67888-9. ISSN 0140-6736.
  4. Fu LY, Moon RY (2012). "Apparent life-threatening events: an update". Pediatr Rev. 33 (8): 361–8, quiz 368-9. doi:10.1542/pir.33-8-361. PMID 22855928.
  5. McGovern MC, Smith MB (2004). "Causes of apparent life threatening events in infants: a systematic review". Arch Dis Child. 89 (11): 1043–8. doi:10.1136/adc.2003.031740. PMC 1719711. PMID 15499062.
  6. Al-Kindy HA, Gélinas JF, Hatzakis G, Côté A (2009). "Risk factors for extreme events in infants hospitalized for apparent life-threatening events". J Pediatr. 154 (3): 332–7, 337.e1–2. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2008.08.051. PMID 18950797.
  7. Santiago-Burruchaga M, Sánchez-Etxaniz J, Benito-Fernández J, Vázquez-Cordero C, Mintegi-Raso S, Labayru-Echeverría M; et al. (2008). "Assessment and management of infants with apparent life-threatening events in the paediatric emergency department". Eur J Emerg Med. 15 (4): 203–8. doi:10.1097/MEJ.0b013e3282f4d13a. PMID 19078815.
  8. Mittal MK, Sun G, Baren JM (2012). "A clinical decision rule to identify infants with apparent life-threatening event who can be safely discharged from the emergency department". Pediatr Emerg Care. 28 (7): 599–605. doi:10.1097/PEC.0b013e31825cf576. PMID 22743742.

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