Sudden infant death syndrome historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Vamsikrishna Gunnam M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a rare syndrome which follows autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is one of the leading cause of infant death especially ages between one month and one year in the United States of America.

Historical Perspective

Discovery

  • In 1830, Kopp’s proposed “thymic asthma” which might lead to the death of the child due to enlargement of the thymus.[1]
  • During 18th century some others suggested that the sudden death in the infant is due to the asphyxial mechanisms, suffocation catarrh, superstition or the actions of witches and gods.[2]
  • In 1969, Horgan was the first to coin the term SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).
  • In 1971, the term SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome) was accepted as an official diagnosis on death certificates.
  • In 1979, World Health Organization (WHO) allocated a unique code number for SIDS under the number 798.0 as WHO International Classification of Diseases.
  • In 1982, Kelly et al was the first to discover the apneic periods in newborn sibs of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).[3][4][5]
  • In 1986, Bass et al was the first to report accidental asphyxiation of infants by the objects on the crib or violent shaking which will eventually results in very severe form called shaken baby syndrome.
  • In 1986, Smialek was the first to collect information on infants twins who died suddenly and simultaneously.[6]
  • In 1990, Back to Sleep program was introduced and there is significant decrease in the cases of SIDS. [7]
  • In 1992, Filiano and Kinney was the first to report the association between developmental hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus and developing of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).[8]
  • In 1995, Pinholster cited about the breathing pattern and the conditions that can predispose to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
  • In 2004, Mage and Donner gave a detailed explanations on infant respiratory mortality that happened in the regions of U.S., U.K., and Scandinavia.[9]
  • "Wear and Tear” hypothesis says that the sudden death in the infant is the result of painful, stressful, or traumatic exposures that the infant exposed in utero due to neonatal regulatory systems incompatible with allostasis.[10]

References

  1. Duncan JR, Byard RW (2018). "SIDS Sudden Infant and Early Childhood Death: The Past, the Present and the Future". PMID 30035966.
  2. Russell-Jones DL (1985). "Sudden infant death in history and literature". Arch Dis Child. 60 (3): 278–81. doi:10.1136/adc.60.3.278. PMC 1777210. PMID 3885870.
  3. Hoppenbrouwers T, Hodgman JE, McGinty D, Harper RM, Sterman MB (1980). "Sudden infant death syndrome: sleep apnea and respiration in subsequent siblings". Pediatrics. 66 (2): 205–14. PMID 7402805.
  4. Flores-Guevara R, Curzi-Dascalova L, Radvanyi MF, Plouin P, Sternberg B, Peraita R; et al. (1982). "Respiratory pauses in normal infants and in siblings of victims of the sudden infant death syndrome". Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol Suppl. 36: 631–40. PMID 6962050.
  5. Schechtman VL, Harper RM, Wilson AJ, Southall DP (1991). "Sleep apnea in infants who succumb to the sudden infant death syndrome". Pediatrics. 87 (6): 841–6. PMID 2034488.
  6. Smialek JE (1986). "Simultaneous sudden infant death syndrome in twins". Pediatrics. 77 (6): 816–21. PMID 3754958.
  7. Waters, Karen A. (2014). "SIDS symposium – A perspective for future research". Paediatric Respiratory Reviews. 15 (4): 285–286. doi:10.1016/j.prrv.2014.09.005. ISSN 1526-0542.
  8. Filiano JJ, Kinney HC (1992). "Arcuate nucleus hypoplasia in the sudden infant death syndrome". J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 51 (4): 394–403. doi:10.1097/00005072-199207000-00002. PMID 1619439.
  9. Mage DT, Donner EM (2004). "The fifty percent male excess of infant respiratory mortality". Acta Paediatr. 93 (9): 1210–5. PMID 15384886.
  10. Elhaik E (2016). "A "Wear and Tear" Hypothesis to Explain Sudden Infant Death Syndrome". Front Neurol. 7: 180. doi:10.3389/fneur.2016.00180. PMC 5083856. PMID 27840622.



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