Sexcord/ stromal ovarian tumors epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief:  ; Maneesha Nandimandalam, M.B.B.S.[2]

Overview

The yearly adjusted incidence rate is approximately 2 per 1,000,000 women for sexcord-stromal ovarian tumors(SCSTs). The mortality rate has gradually been declining from1976 (10.0 per 100,000) and 2015 (6.7 per 100,000) by 33%. The age at presentation varies depending on the subtypes of sexcord-stromal ovarian tumors. Sexcord-stromal ovarian tumors(SCSTs) have more predilection in women of Caucasian background. Rates are highest among Whites, intermediate for Hispanics, and lowest among Blacks, and Asian people. Intrestingly there has been increases in incidence and mortality rates in less developed countries with recent economic growth and lifestyle changes.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence

Ovarian cancer incidence exhibits wide geographic variation,Reid BM, Permuth JB, Sellers TA. Epidemiology of ovarian cancer: a review. Cancer Biol Med. 2017;14(1):9–32. doi:10.20892/j.issn.2095-3941.2016.0084, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/,https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5365187/

Ovarian cancer incidence rates.gif

Case-fatality rate/Mortality rate

Age

The age at presentation varies depending on the subtypes of sexcord-stromal ovarian tumors:[8]

Fibromas:

  • Although they can present at any age, the mean age of occurrence is in the late forties

Thecomas:

Sclerosing stromal tumor(SSTs):

  • SSTs are more likely to occur in young women
  • Approximately 80% of the reported cases are under 30 years of age
  • A few cases have been reported in premenarchal girls, although SSTs most commonly occur after menarche

Steroid cell tumors:

  • The average age of presentation is 43 years

Adult and juvenile granulosa cell tumors:

Race

  • Racial predilection do exist for sexcord-stromal ovarian tumors[2][9]
  • Racial differences in incidence and mortality within the United States are similar to the observed international variation
  • Sexcord-stromal ovarian tumors(SCSTs) have more predilection in women of Caucasian background
  • Rates are highest among Whites, intermediate for Hispanics, and lowest among Blacks, and Asian people
USCIS.gif

Developed Countries versus Developing countries

References

  1. Reid BM, Permuth JB, Sellers TA (February 2017). "Epidemiology of ovarian cancer: a review". Cancer Biol Med. 14 (1): 9–32. doi:10.20892/j.issn.2095-3941.2016.0084. PMC 5365187. PMID 28443200.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Boussios S, Zarkavelis G, Seraj E, Zerdes I, Tatsi K, Pentheroudakis G (October 2016). "Non-epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Elucidating Uncommon Gynaecological Malignancies". Anticancer Res. 36 (10): 5031–5042. doi:10.21873/anticanres.11072. PMID 27798862.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Torre LA, Trabert B, DeSantis CE, Miller KD, Samimi G, Runowicz CD, Gaudet MM, Jemal A, Siegel RL (July 2018). "Ovarian cancer statistics, 2018". CA Cancer J Clin. 68 (4): 284–296. doi:10.3322/caac.21456. PMID 29809280.
  4. Lowe KA, Chia VM, Taylor A, O'Malley C, Kelsh M, Mohamed M, Mowat FS, Goff B (July 2013). "An international assessment of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality". Gynecol. Oncol. 130 (1): 107–14. doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.03.026. PMID 23558050.
  5. Sopik V, Rosen B, Giannakeas V, Narod SA (September 2015). "Why have ovarian cancer mortality rates declined? Part III. Prospects for the future". Gynecol. Oncol. 138 (3): 757–61. doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2015.06.019. PMID 26086565.
  6. Sopik V, Iqbal J, Rosen B, Narod SA (September 2015). "Why have ovarian cancer mortality rates declined? Part I. Incidence". Gynecol. Oncol. 138 (3): 741–9. doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2015.06.017. PMID 26080287.
  7. Sopik V, Iqbal J, Rosen B, Narod SA (September 2015). "Why have ovarian cancer mortality rates declined? Part II. Case-fatality". Gynecol. Oncol. 138 (3): 750–6. doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2015.06.016. PMID 26080288.
  8. Horta M, Cunha TM (2015). "Sex cord-stromal tumors of the ovary: a comprehensive review and update for radiologists". Diagn Interv Radiol. 21 (4): 277–86. doi:10.5152/dir.2015.34414. PMC 4498422. PMID 26054417.
  9. Anteby SO, Mor Yosef S, Schenker JG (1983). "Ovarian cancer. Geographical, host and environmental factors. An overview". Arch. Gynecol. 234 (2): 137–48. PMID 6364995.

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