Kawasaki disease historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Dildar Hussain, MBBS [2]

Overview

Kawasaki disease was first discovered by Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki when he saw his first case of Kawasaki disease in Japan, in 1961. Later in 1967, Kawasaki published his first report of Kawasaki disease in Japanese. Dr Kawasaki also established the "Japan Kawasaki Disease Research Center" in 1990.

Historical Perspective

Discovery

The historical timeline on Kawasaki disease is described below:[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

  • In 1961, Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki saw his first case of Kawasaki disease.
  • In 1967, Kawasaki published his first report of Kawasaki disease in Japanese.
  • In the 1960s, pathologist Noboru Tanaka and pediatrician Takajiro Yamamoto disputed the early assertion of Kawasaki that Kawasaki disease was a self-limited illness with no sequelae.
  • In 1970, the first Japanese nationwide survey of Kawasaki disease was conducted and 10 autopsy cases of sudden cardiac death after Kawasaki disease were documented.
  • In 1973, at the University of Hawaii hospital, pathologist Eunice Larson, in collaboration with Benjamin Landing at the Los Angeles Children's Hospital, retrospectively established a diagnosis of Kawasaki disease in a 1971 autopsy case.
  • In 1974, Tomisaku Kawasaki published the first English language report of 50 patients with Kawasaki disease.
  • By 1974, the link between Kawasaki disease and coronary artery vasculitis was definitively established.
  • In 1976, the first cases of Kawasaki disease outside of Japan were reported in Hawaii.
  • In 1988, the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics declared IVIG treatment as the recommended therapy for Kawasaki disease.
  • In 1990, Dr Kawasaki established the "Japan Kawasaki Disease Research Center".

Impact on Cultural History

  • In March 2006, Kawasaki disease was mentioned in the television programs Nip/Tuck and Without a Trace, and in the episode 'All In" of the TV series House, it was inexplicably mentioned as a possible diagnosis for a 6 year old boy that was admitted with bloody diarrhea and coordination problems, as well as an elderly woman with unexplained respiratory, cardiovascular and neural deficiencies.
  • Maxie Jones, a fictional character on General Hospital suffers from it.
  • According to John Travolta and Kelly Preston, their son Jett Travolta also suffered from the disease.

References

  1. Burns, Jane C.; Kushner, Howard I.; Bastian, John F.; Shike, Hiroko; Shimizu, Chisato; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Turner, Christena L. (2000). "Kawasaki Disease: A Brief History". Pediatrics. 106 (2): e27–e27. doi:10.1542/peds.106.2.e27. ISSN 0031-4005.
  2. Kawasaki Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2013). http://www.cdc.gov/kawasaki/ Accessed on July 28, 2016.
  3. Kawasaki T (1967). "[Acute febrile mucocutaneous syndrome with lymphoid involvement with specific desquamation of the fingers and toes in children]". Arerugi (in Japanese)|format= requires |url= (help). 16 (3): 178–222. PMID 6062087.
  4. Kawasaki T (1967). "[Acute febrile mucocutaneous syndrome with lymphoid involvement with specific desquamation of the fingers and toes in children]". Arerugi (in Japanese)|format= requires |url= (help). 16 (3): 178–222. PMID 6062087.
  5. Episode 86 (4x16) - The Little Things (2 March, 2006)
  6. Kawasaki T (1967). "[Acute febrile mucocutaneous syndrome with lymphoid involvement with specific desquamation of the fingers and toes in children]". Arerugi (in Japanese)|format= requires |url= (help). 16 (3): 178–222. PMID 6062087.
  7. Sánchez-Manubens J, Bou R, Anton J (2014). "Diagnosis and classification of Kawasaki disease". J. Autoimmun. 48-49: 113–7. doi:10.1016/j.jaut.2014.01.010. PMID 24485156.

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