Schistosomiasis natural history, complications and prognosis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] ; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aditya Ganti M.B.B.S. [2]

Overview

If left untreated, most of the patients with schistosomiasis may progress to develop ulceration or cancer of the bladder, liver or kidney failure. Common complications of schistosomiasis include hematuria, malnutrition, intestinal polyps, hydronephrosis, glomerulonephritis, bladder polyps, bladder cancer, infertility, ectopic pregnancy, renal failure, and cor-pulmonale. Depending on the extent of the disease progression at the time of diagnosis, the prognosis of schistosomiasis may vary. However, the prognosis is generally regarded as good with treatment.

Natural History

If left untreated, most of the patients with schistosomiasis may progress to develop ulceration or cancer of the bladder, liver or kidney failure.[1]

Complications

Common complications of schistosomiasis include:[2][3]

Prognosis

  • Depending on the extent of the disease progression at the time of diagnosis, the prognosis of schistosomiasis may vary.
  • Prognosis is good with treatment.
  • The 1-year mortality rate of patients with schistosomiasis ranges approximately 0.1-11% depending upon underlying complications.
  • If symptoms of schistosomiasis persists after 2 rounds of praziquantel treatment, more urine or stool samples should be taken and tested for viable parasite eggs, and re-treatment must be given if persistent infection is detected.[4][5]

References

  1. Gundamaraju R (2014). "Novel antipathy for schistosomiasis-the most lethal ailment of the tropical region". Asian Pac J Trop Biomed. 4 (Suppl 1): S43–5. doi:10.12980/APJTB.4.2014C831. PMC 4025338. PMID 25183124.
  2. Schafer TW, Hale BR (2001). "Gastrointestinal complications of schistosomiasis". Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 3 (4): 293–303. PMID 11469998.
  3. Wu GY, Halim MH (2000). "Schistosomiasis: progress and problems". World J. Gastroenterol. 6 (1): 12–19. PMC 4723577. PMID 11819515.
  4. "CDC - Schistosomiasis - Resources for Health Professionals".
  5. "WHO | Schistosomiasis".

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