Amoebic liver abscess history and symptoms

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yamuna Kondapally, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Specific areas of focus when obtaining a history from the patient include history of recent travel to or resident of endemic areas, time of onset (duration of symptoms <14 days), history of dysentery within the previous few months, fever and abdominal pain.[1]Symptoms of amoebic liver abscess include moderate to severe abdominal pain, malaise, loss of appetite, sweating, weight loss, epigastric pain (Commonly seen in left lobe abscesses), fever (high fever with chills is suggestive of secondary bacterial infection), anorexia, pleuritic chest pain, Cough with or without expectoration and chest pain (may be due to abscess rupture into the pleural cavity), jaundice, confusion, abdominal distension, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea and constipation[2][3][4][5][6][7]

History

Specific areas of focus when obtaining a history from the patient include history of amoebic liver abscess include:[1]

Symptoms

After exposure, 80% of infection patients develop symptoms with in few days to 4-5 weeks. Symptoms of amoebic liver abscess include:[3][4][5][6][7]

Common symptoms

  • Localized to right upper quadrant radiated to right shoulder or diffuse
  • Pain is intense, continuous or stabbing
  • Pain aggravates with coughing, deep breathing, walking and while resting on right side

Symptoms associated with complications

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Tanyuksel M, Petri WA (2003). "Laboratory diagnosis of amebiasis". Clin Microbiol Rev. 16 (4): 713–29. PMC 207118. PMID 14557296.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Lyche KD, Jensen WA, Kirsch CM, Yenokida GG, Maltz GS, Knauer CM (1990). "Pleuropulmonary manifestations of hepatic amebiasis". West J Med. 153 (3): 275–8. PMC 1002529. PMID 2219891.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Ximénez C, Morán P, Rojas L, Valadez A, Gómez A, Ramiro M; et al. (2011). "Novelties on amoebiasis: a neglected tropical disease". J Glob Infect Dis. 3 (2): 166–74. doi:10.4103/0974-777X.81695. PMC 3125031. PMID 21731305.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ximénez C, Morán P, Rojas L, Valadez A, Gómez A (2009). "Reassessment of the epidemiology of amebiasis: state of the art". Infect Genet Evol. 9 (6): 1023–32. doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2009.06.008. PMID 19540361.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Pritt BS, Clark CG (2008). "Amebiasis". Mayo Clin Proc. 83 (10): 1154–9, quiz 1159-60. doi:10.4065/83.10.1154. PMID 18828976.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Ali IK, Solaymani-Mohammadi S, Akhter J, Roy S, Gorrini C, Calderaro A; et al. (2008). "Tissue invasion by Entamoeba histolytica: evidence of genetic selection and/or DNA reorganization events in organ tropism". PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2 (4): e219. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0000219. PMC 2274956. PMID 18398490.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Ximénez C, Cerritos R, Rojas L, Dolabella S, Morán P, Shibayama M; et al. (2010). "Human amebiasis: breaking the paradigm?". Int J Environ Res Public Health. 7 (3): 1105–20. doi:10.3390/ijerph7031105. PMC 2872301. PMID 20617021.

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