Amoebic liver abscess diagnostic approach

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yamuna Kondapally, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Diagnostic approach includes laboratory methods like microscopy, culture, antigen, and antibody detection and radiologic method like CT scan, MRI, and ultrasonography.

Diagnostic Approach

Diagnostic approach for the patients with amoebic liver abscess[1]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Signs and symptoms(a)
Fever, abdominal pain, point tenderness over the liver, hepatomegaly, weight loss
History
Travel to endemic areas, immigrant from endemic areas, having had dysentery within last years, gender (male/female:9/1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Laboratory diagnosis(LD) and Radiologic Methods (RM) (US, CT or MRI)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LD negative and RM negative:Flow
 
 
 
 
 
 
LD negative and RM positive:aspiration, if possible(b)
 
 
 
 
 
 
LD positive and RM positive: chemotherapy / surgical treatment
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pyogenic abscesses
Neoplasia (hepatocellular carcinoma)
Cysticercosis
Cystic echinococcosis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amoebic liver abscess

Laboratory Diagnosis (LD)

a. Acute clinical manifestations are associated with multiple amoebic abscess

b. Aspiration contraindicated for cystic echinococcosis

Adopted from Clinical Microbiology Reviews Clin Microbiol Rev. 2003 Oct; 16(4): 713–729.

References

  1. Tanyuksel M, Petri WA (2003). "Laboratory diagnosis of amebiasis". Clin Microbiol Rev. 16 (4): 713–29. PMC 207118. PMID 14557296.

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