Amoebic liver abscess epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yamuna Kondapally, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Amoebiasis is the second leading cause of death worldwide from parasitic disease.[1][2][3]500 million people are infected with Entamoeba histolytica every year. 50 million individuals develop liver abscess and colitis and results in death in 40,000-100,000 individuals annually. Of all cases of amoebiasis, 3% to 9% of patients reported to have amoebic liver abscess. It most commonly occurs in 20 to 45 years age.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence and Prevalence

Age

Gender

Developed and Developing Countries

  • Mexico
  • The Indian subcontinent
  • Indonesia
  • Sub saharan and tropical regions of Africa
  • Parts of central and south America
  • Homosexual men
  • Immigrants
  • Recent travel to endemic areas
  • Institutionalized persons
  • HIV positive individuals

References

  1. Leber, Amy L., and Susan Novak-Weekley. "Intestinal and urogenital amebae, flagellates, and ciliates." Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th Edition. American Society of Microbiology, 2011. 2149-2171.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Baxt LA, Singh U (2008). "New insights into Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis". Curr Opin Infect Dis. 21 (5): 489–94. doi:10.1097/QCO.0b013e32830ce75f. PMC 2688559. PMID 18725798.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Haque R, Huston CD, Hughes M, Houpt E, Petri WA (2003). "Amebiasis". N Engl J Med. 348 (16): 1565–73. doi:10.1056/NEJMra022710. PMID 12700377.
  4. Leber, Amy L., and Susan Novak-Weekley. "Intestinal and urogenital amebae, flagellates, and ciliates." Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th Edition. American Society of Microbiology, 2011. 2149-2171.
  5. Zafar A, Ahmed S (2002). "Amoebic liver abscess: a comparative study of needle aspiration versus conservative treatment". J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. 14 (1): 10–2. PMID 12043323.
  6. Acuna-Soto R, Maguire JH, Wirth DF (2000). "Gender distribution in asymptomatic and invasive amebiasis". Am. J. Gastroenterol. 95 (5): 1277–83. doi:10.1111/j.1572-0241.2000.01525.x. PMID 10811339.
  7. Adams EB, MacLeod IN (1977). "Invasive amebiasis. II. Amebic liver abscess and its complications". Medicine (Baltimore). 56 (4): 325–34. PMID 875719.
  8. Katzenstein D, Rickerson V, Braude A (1982). "New concepts of amebic liver abscess derived from hepatic imaging, serodiagnosis, and hepatic enzymes in 67 consecutive cases in San Diego". Medicine (Baltimore). 61 (4): 237–46. PMID 6806561.
  9. Leber, Amy L., and Susan Novak-Weekley. "Intestinal and urogenital amebae, flagellates, and ciliates." Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th Edition. American Society of Microbiology, 2011. 2149-2171.
  10. Stanley SL (2003). "Amoebiasis". Lancet. 361 (9362): 1025–34. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(03)12830-9. PMID 12660071.
  11. Kurland JE, Brann OS (2004). "Pyogenic and amebic liver abscesses". Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 6 (4): 273–9. PMID 15245694.
  12. Tanyuksel M, Petri WA (2003). "Laboratory diagnosis of amebiasis". Clin Microbiol Rev. 16 (4): 713–29. PMC 207118. PMID 14557296.

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