Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice

Jump to: navigation, search

Acute Diarrhea Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Acute Diarrhea from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-ray

Echocardiography and Ultrasound

CT scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Guidelines for Management

Case Studies

Case #1

Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice

CDC on Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice

Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice in the news

Blogs on Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice

Directions to Hospitals Treating Psoriasis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Acute diarrhea diagnostic study of choice

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sudarshana Datta, MD [2]

Overview

There is no established diagnostic study of choice for acute diarrhea, as it is generally self-limited. Specific diagnostic studies are performed if symptoms last >7 days, in moderate-to-severe cases, dysentery, and to determine etiology in order to enable directed pathogen-specific therapy.

Diagnostic Study of Choice

There is no established diagnostic study of choice for acute diarrhea as it is generally self-limited. Specific diagnostic studies are performed if symptoms last >7 days, in moderate-to-severe cases, dysentery, and to determine etiology in order to enable directed pathogen-specific therapy.[1][2] 

References

  1. Guerrant RL, Van Gilder T, Steiner TS, Thielman NM, Slutsker L, Tauxe RV, Hennessy T, Griffin PM, DuPont H, Sack RB, Tarr P, Neill M, Nachamkin I, Reller LB, Osterholm MT, Bennish ML, Pickering LK (2001). "Practice guidelines for the management of infectious diarrhea". Clin. Infect. Dis. 32 (3): 331–51. doi:10.1086/318514. PMID 11170940.
  2. Guerrant RL, Shields DS, Thorson SM, Schorling JB, Gröschel DH (1985). "Evaluation and diagnosis of acute infectious diarrhea". Am. J. Med. 78 (6B): 91–8. PMID 4014291.

Linked-in.jpg