Polycystic kidney disease epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: M. Khurram Afzal, MD [2], Serge Korjian, Yazan Daaboul

Overview

The prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is approximately 100 - 250 per 100,000 individuals in the United States. The prevalence of ADPKD varies in different countries. The prevalence of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is approximately 5 per 100,000 children in the United States. The incidence increases with age for ADPKD. ARPKD commonly affects infants and children. Males and females are equally affected by ADPKD.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Prevalence

  • The prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is approximately 100 - 250 per 100,000 individuals in the United States.[1][2][3]
  • In 2013, the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was estimated to be 33 cases per 100,000 individuals in Germany.[4]
  • In 1998, the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was estimated to be 25 cases per 100,000 individuals in Japan.[5]
  • In 1996, the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was estimated to be 90 cases per 100,000 individuals in France.[6]
  • In 1991, the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was estimated to be 41 cases per 100,000 individuals in United Kingdom.[7]
  • In 1957, the prevalence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was estimated to be 100 cases per 100,000 individuals in Denmark.[8]
  • The prevalence of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is approximately 5 per 100,000 children in the United States.[9]

Age

  • The incidence of ADPKD increases with age; the average age at diagnosis is 30 - 50 years.[2]
  • ARPKD commonly affects infants and children.[9]

Race

  • There is no racial predilection to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

Gender

  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease affects men and women equally.[10]

References

  1. Iglesias CG, Torres VE, Offord KP, Holley KE, Beard CM, Kurland LT (May 1983). "Epidemiology of adult polycystic kidney disease, Olmsted County, Minnesota: 1935-1980". Am. J. Kidney Dis. 2 (6): 630–9. PMID 6846334.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Gabow PA (July 1993). "Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease". N. Engl. J. Med. 329 (5): 332–42. doi:10.1056/NEJM199307293290508. PMID 8321262.
  3. Levy M, Feingold J (September 2000). "Estimating prevalence in single-gene kidney diseases progressing to renal failure". Kidney Int. 58 (3): 925–43. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1755.2000.00250.x. PMID 10972657.
  4. Neumann HP, Jilg C, Bacher J, Nabulsi Z, Malinoc A, Hummel B; et al. (2013). "Epidemiology of autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: an in-depth clinical study for south-western Germany". Nephrol Dial Transplant. 28 (6): 1472–87. doi:10.1093/ndt/gfs551. PMID 23300259.
  5. Higashihara E, Nutahara K, Kojima M, Tamakoshi A, Yoshiyuki O, Sakai H; et al. (1998). "Prevalence and renal prognosis of diagnosed autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in Japan". Nephron. 80 (4): 421–7. PMID 9832641.
  6. Simon P, Le Goff JY, Ang KS, Charasse C, Le Cacheux P, Cam G (1996). "[Epidemiologic data, clinical and prognostic features of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a French region]". Nephrologie. 17 (2): 123–30. PMID 8838759.
  7. Davies F, Coles GA, Harper PS, Williams AJ, Evans C, Cochlin D (1991). "Polycystic kidney disease re-evaluated: a population-based study". Q J Med. 79 (290): 477–85. PMID 1946928.
  8. DALGAARD OZ (1957). "Bilateral polycystic disease of the kidneys; a follow-up of two hundred and eighty-four patients and their families". Acta Med Scand Suppl. 328: 1–255. PMID 13469269‎ Check |pmid= value (help).
  9. 9.0 9.1 Guay-Woodford LM, Desmond RA (May 2003). "Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease: the clinical experience in North America". Pediatrics. 111 (5 Pt 1): 1072–80. PMID 12728091.
  10. Torres VE, Harris PC, Pirson Y (2007). "Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease". Lancet. 369 (9569): 1287–301. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(07)60601-1. PMID 17434405.

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