Chronic renal failure classification

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Feham Tariq, MD [2]

Overview

The aim of chronic kidney disease (CKD) staging is to guide management, stratifying the risk of progression and complications of CKD. Risk stratification is used as a guide to inform appropriate treatments and the intensity for monitoring and patient education. In patients who are diagnosed with CKD, staging is done according to glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria.

Classification

  • The aim of chronic kidney disease (CKD) staging is to guide management, stratifying the risk of progression and complications of CKD.[1]
  • Risk stratification is used as a guide to inform appropriate treatments and the intensity for monitoring and patient education.
  • In patients who are diagnosed with CKD, staging is done according to glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria.[2]

1.Chronic kidney disease classification based upon glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria:

GFR stages GFR(mL/min/1.73 m2) Terms
G1 ≥90 Normal or high
G2 60 to 89 Mildly decreased
G3a 45 to 59 Mildly to moderately decreased
G3b 30 to 44 Moderately to severely decreased
G4 15 to 29 Severely decreased
G5 <15 Kidney failure (add D if treated by dialysis)
Albuminuria stages AER(mg/day) Terms
A1 <30 Normal to mildly increased (may be subdivided for risk prediction)
A2 30 to 300 Moderately increased
A3 >300 Severely increased (may be subdivided into nephrotic and non-nephrotic for differential diagnosis, management, and risk prediction)

Acute and Chronic CKD:

  • Based on the duration of symptoms, CKD may be classified as either acute or chronic.

References

  1. Tsibul'skaia MM, Andreeva AP, Levina AA, Shirinova EA, Tokarev I (November 1986). "[Combined sickle-cell anemia and alpha-thalassemia]". Gematol Transfuziol (in Russian). 31 (11): 3–7. PMID 2948868. Vancouver style error: initials (help)
  2. Eckardt KU, Coresh J, Devuyst O, Johnson RJ, Köttgen A, Levey AS, Levin A (July 2013). "Evolving importance of kidney disease: from subspecialty to global health burden". Lancet. 382 (9887): 158–69. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60439-0. PMID 23727165.

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