Ankylosing spondylitis risk factors

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] ; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Vamsikrishna Gunnam M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

There is no known cause specific cause for ankylosing spondylitis, though genetic factors seems to play very important role in developing the disease. In particular, people who are positive for HLA-B27 are at more risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis.Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of chronic joint inflammation that mostly affects the spine. Gradually it can cause the bones of the spine to fuse together, a process which is called ankylosis.

Risk Factors

  • There is no known cause specific cause for ankylosing spondylitis, though genetic factors seem to play a very important role in developing the disease. In particular, people who are positive for HLA-B27 are at more risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis.Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of chronic joint inflammation that mostly affects the spine. Gradually it can cause the bones of the spine to fuse together, a process which is called ankylosis.[1]
  • The most potent risk factor in the development of ankylosing spondylitis is positive for HLA-B27. Other risk factors include environmental, gender, and age.[2]

References

  1. Reveille JD, Weisman MH (June 2013). "The epidemiology of back pain, axial spondyloarthritis and HLA-B27 in the United States". Am. J. Med. Sci. 345 (6): 431–6. PMC 4122314Freely accessible. PMID 23841117. 
  2. Dillon CF, Hirsch R (April 2011). "The United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the epidemiology of ankylosing spondylitis". Am. J. Med. Sci. 341 (4): 281–3. PMID 21358307. doi:10.1097/MAJ.0b013e31820f8c83. 

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