Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms

Jump to: navigation, search

Ankylosing spondylitis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Ankylosing spondylitis from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X Ray

CT

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Surgery

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms

CDC on Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms

Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms in the news

Blogs on Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms</small>

Directions to Hospitals Treating Ankylosing spondylitis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Ankylosing spondylitis history and symptoms

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Ankylosing spondylitis typically presents in a young patient with chronic pain and stiffness in the lower part of the spine. In 40% of the cases, ankylosing spondylitis is associated with iridocyclitis (anterior uveitis, also known as iritis) causing eye pain and photophobia (increased sensitivity to light). Other common symptoms include recurring mouth ulcers (aphthae) and fatigue.

History

The typical patient is young, of 15 to 30 years of age with chronic pain and stiffness in the lower part of the spine. Men are affected more than women by a ratio in excess of 2:1.[1] In 40% of cases, ankylosing spondylitis is associated with iridocyclitis (anterior uveitis, also known as iritis) causing eye pain and photophobia (increased sensitivity to light). Other common symptoms are recurring mouth ulcers (aphthae) and fatigue. Pain fluctuation from one side to the other.

Typical prodromes (early symptoms) may occur at a very young age (e.g. 3 years old), where the patient may experience recurring painful joints (e.g. knees, elbows), commonly misinterpreted as simple rheumatism.

Common Synmptoms

The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), developed in Bath (Somerset,UK) is an index designed to detect the inflammatory burden of active disease. The BASDA can help to establish a diagnosis of AS in the presence of other factors such as HLA-B27 positivity, persistent buttock pain which resolves with exercise, and X-ray or MRI evident involvement of the sacroiliac joints. [2] It can be easily calculated and accurately assesses a patient's need for additional therapy; a score of 4 out of a possible 10 points while on adequate NSAID therapy is usually considered a good candidate for biologic therapy.

The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) is a functional index which can accurately assess a patient's functional impairment due to the disease, as well as improvements following therapy.[3] The BASFI is not usually used as a diagnostic tool, but as a tool to establish a patient's current baseline and subsequent response to therapy.

References

  1. http://www.spondylitis.org/patient_resources/women.aspx
  2. Garrett S, Jenkinson T, Kennedy L, Whitelock H, Gaisford P, Calin A (1994). "A new approach to defining disease status in ankylosing spondylitis: the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index.". J Rheumatol. 21 (12): 2286–91. PMID 7699630. 
  3. Calin A, Garrett S, Whitelock H, Kennedy L, O'Hea J, Mallorie P, Jenkinson T (1994). "A new approach to defining functional ability in ankylosing spondylitis: the development of the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index.". J Rheumatol. 21 (12): 2281–5. PMID 7699629. 

Linked-in.jpg