Acute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors

Jump to: navigation, search

Acute viral nasopharyngitis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating acute viral nasopharyngitis from other diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X-ray

CT

MRI

Ultrasound

Other imaging findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Acute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Acute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Acute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors

CDC on Acute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors

Acute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors in the news

Blogs onAcute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors

Directions to Hospitals Treating Osteoporosis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Acute viral nasopharyngitis risk factors

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmed Younes M.B.B.CH [2]

Overview

Common risk factors for acute viral nasopharyngitis include having contact with an infected patient, spending time in daycare centers, presence of allergic rhinitis or immunocompromisation.

Despite that infection with common cold tend to have a seasonal pattern, there is no proven association between cold exposure or chilling and the occurrence of common colds.

Risk factors

More common risk factors

Common risk factors for acute viral nasopharyngitis include:

Exposure to cold weather

  • Despite the fact that most common colds occur in fall and winter, there is no proven association between cold exposure or chilling and the occurrence of common colds.[2][3]
  • Regarding the causation of cold-like symptoms, researchers at the Common Cold Centre at the Cardiff University conducted a study to test the hypothesis that "acute cooling of the feet causes the onset of common cold symptoms." The study measured the subjects' self-reported cold symptoms and their belief of having a cold; but not whether an actual respiratory infection developed. The researchers concluded that common cold symptoms can be generated by acute chilling of the feet, but "further studies are needed to determine the relationship between symptom generation with any respiratory infection."[4]

Less common risk factors

Less common risk factors include:

  • Pregnant women are at increased risk of contacting the common cold for up to 2 weeks after delivery. Although, Breastfeeding decreases the risk of contacting the common cold
  • Old age (> 65 years)
  • Morbid obesity (BMI > 35)[5]

References

  1. Heikkinen T, Järvinen A (2003). "The common cold". Lancet. 361 (9351): 51–9. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(03)12162-9. PMID 12517470.
  2. Eccles R (2002). "Acute cooling of the body surface and the common cold". Rhinology. 40 (3): 109–14. PMID 12357708.
  3. Douglas, R.G.Jr, K.M. Lindgren, and R.B. Couch (1968). "Exposure to cold environment and rhinovirus common cold. Failure to demonstrate effect". New Engl. J. Med. 279.
  4. Johnson C, Eccles R (2005). "Acute cooling of the feet and the onset of common cold symptoms". Family Practice. 22 (6): 608–13. doi:10.1093/fampra/cmi072. PMID 16286463.
  5. Heeler RM (1997). "Social ties and susceptibility to the common cold". JAMA. 278 (15): 1231–2. PMID 9333254.

Linked-in.jpg