Acute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy

Jump to: navigation, search

Acute viral nasopharyngitis Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating acute viral nasopharyngitis from other diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X-ray

CT

MRI

Ultrasound

Other imaging findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Acute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Acute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Acute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy

CDC on Acute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy

Acute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy in the news

Blogs onAcute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy</small>

Directions to Hospitals Treating Osteoporosis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Acute viral nasopharyngitis cost-effectiveness of therapy

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Cost Effectiveness of Therapy

  • In the USA alone, the common cold leads to 75-100 million physician visits annually, at a conservative cost estimate of $7.7 billion per year.
  • Americans spend $2.9 billion on over-the-counter drugs and another $400 million on prescribed medicines, both for symptomatic relief.
  • More than one-third of patients who saw a doctor received an antibiotic prescription, not only contributes to unnecessary costs ($1.1 billion annually on an estimated 41 million antibiotic prescriptions in the United States), but also has implications for antibiotic resistance.
  • An estimated 22-189 million school days are missed annually due to a cold. As a result, parents missed 126 million workdays to stay home to care for their children. When added to the 150 million workdays missed by employees suffering from a cold, the total economic impact of cold-related work loss exceeds $20 billion.[1]

References

  1. Fendrick, A. Mark; Monto, Arnold S.; Nightengale, Brian; Sarnes, Matthew (2003). "The Economic Burden of Non–Influenza-Related Viral Respiratory Tract Infection in the United States". Archives of Internal Medicine. 163 (4): 487. ISSN 0003-9926. doi:10.1001/archinte.163.4.487. 

Linked-in.jpg