Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia other diagnostic studies

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Other Diagnostic Studies

  • In children, the same clinical presentation but with variable course especially in very young children; both leukocytosis and organomegaly may be present in children with M7. Complete remission and long term survival are more common in children than adults.
  • In blood and bone marrow smears megakaryoblasts are usually medium sized to large cells with a high nuclear- cytoplasmic ratio. Nuclear chromatin is dense and homogeneous. There is scanty, variable basophilic cytoplasm which may be vacuolated. An irregular cytoplasmic border is often noted in some of the megakaryoblasts and occasionally projections resembling budding atypical platelets are present. Megakaryoblasts lack myeloperoxidase activity and stain negatively with sudan black B.
  • They are alpha naphthyl butyrate esterase negative and manifest variable alpha naphythyl acetate esterase activity usually in scattered clumps or granules in the cytoplasm. PAS staining also varies from negative to focal or granular positivity, to strongly positive staining.
  • A marrow aspirate is difficult to obtain in many cases because of variable degree of myelofibrosis.

References

  1. Lei Q, Liu Y, Tang SQ (2007). "[Childhood acute megakaryoblastic leukemia]". Zhongguo Shi Yan Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi (in Chinese). 15 (3): 528–32. PMID 17605859.
  2. Vardiman JW, Harris NL, Brunning RD (2002). "The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of the myeloid neoplasms". Blood. 100 (7): 2292–302. doi:10.1182/blood-2002-04-1199. PMID 12239137.

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