Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia pathophysiology

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

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Pathophysiology

It is associated with GATA1, and risks are increased in individuals with Down syndrome.[1] However, not all cases are associated with Down syndrome,[2] and other genes can also be associated with AMKL.[3]

This category of AML is associate with 30% or more blasts in the marrow, blast are identified as being of megakaryocyte lineage by; Expression of megakaryocyte specific antigens and platelet peroxidase reaction on electron microscopy.

References

  1. Hitzler JK, Cheung J, Li Y, Scherer SW, Zipursky A (2003). "GATA1 mutations in transient leukemia and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia of Down syndrome". Blood. 101 (11): 4301–4. doi:10.1182/blood-2003-01-0013. PMID 12586620.
  2. Hama A, Yagasaki H, Takahashi Y; et al. (2008). "Acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL) in children: a comparison of AMKL with and without Down syndrome". Br. J. Haematol. 140 (5): 552–61. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2141.2007.06971.x. PMID 18275433.
  3. Gu TL, Mercher T, Tyner JW; et al. (2007). "A novel fusion of RBM6 to CSF1R in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia". Blood. 110 (1): 323–33. doi:10.1182/blood-2006-10-052282. PMID 17360941.

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