Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome drug prophylaxis

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor-In-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]

Drug Prophylaxis In The Patient With Proven Tachyarrhythmias

  1. Should receive prophylactic treatment if the arrhythmia is poorly tolerated.
  2. In Wellen's experience amiodarone is the most effective in preventing attacks of paroxysmal tachycardia in patients with WPW. Otherwise he recommends quinidine, disopyramide, procainamide or propranolol alone or in combination.
  3. For those patients with life-threatening rates during afib, Wellen's recommends amiodarone as prophylaxis which prolongs the AP refractory period. Quinidine is an alternative, but is less effective.
  4. These patients should undergo EP studies to assess the adequacy of treatment.
  5. These authors state that the refractory period of the AP can shorten in the presence of sympathetic stimulation and advocate the addition of a beta blocker.

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