Necrotizing fasciitis laboratory findings

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yamuna Kondapally, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Laboratory findings consistent with the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis include positive blood and tissue culture, elevated inflammatory markers, leukocytosis and elevated serum creatinine.

Laboratory Findings

Laboratory tests consistent with diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis include:[1]

Microbiology

The following are the tests used to diagnose the causative organism:

Biochemistry

The biochemistry findings consistent with diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis include:

Hematology

The following are complete blood count with differential findings:

Tissue oxygen saturation

Other diagnostic studies of necrotizing fasciitis include:[2]

  • Tissue oxygen saturation monitoring:
  • Occurs at the bedside.
  • Is a noninvasive method to continuously monitor extremities at risk and avoid delayed diagnosis
    • Tissue oxygen saturation is measured using near-infrared spectroscopy.
  • In patients with necrotizing faciitis, oxygen saturation are often diminished in the lower extremities and return to normal after fasciotomy.

References

  1. Puvanendran R, Huey JC, Pasupathy S (2009). "Necrotizing fasciitis". Can Fam Physician. 55 (10): 981–7. PMC 2762295. PMID 19826154.
  2. Wang TL, Hung CR (2004). "Role of tissue oxygen saturation monitoring in diagnosing necrotizing fasciitis of the lower limbs". Ann Emerg Med. 44 (3): 222–8. doi:10.1016/S0196064404003038. PMID 15332062.

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