Necrotizing fasciitis historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Yamuna Kondapally, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Narcotizing fasciitis was first described by Hippocrates in the fifth century B.C. as the complication of erysipelas.[1][2] During the Civil War, necrotizing fasciitis was described as "hospital gangrene" by Confederate Army surgeon Joseph Jones.[3][4] In 1924, Frank L. Meleney reported a series of 20 patients as having hemolytic streptococcal gangrene, later called Meleney's gangrene.[5] Necrotizing fasciitis of perineum was described in 1883 by the French physician Jean Alfred Fournier.[6]

Historical Perspective

  • Necrotizing fasciitis was first described by Hippocrates in the fifth century B.C. as the complication of erysipelas.[1][2]
  • During the Civil War, necrotizing faciitis was described as "hospital gangrene" by Confederate Army surgeon Joseph Jones.[3][4][7]
  • In 1924, Frank L. Meleney reported a series of 20 patients as having hemolytic streptococcal gangrene, later called Meleney's gangrene.[5]
  • The association between bacterial infection and necrotizing fasciitis was made in 1918.
  • In 1952, the disease was named as necrotizing fasciitis by Wilson.[3]
  • Necrotizing fasciitis of perineum was described in 1883 by the French physician, Jean Alfred Fournier.[6]
  • Guiliano and colleagues divided the necrotizing fasciitis into type I and type II.[8]
  • In 1989, Stevens and colleagues were the first to characterize unique clinical characteristics associated with GASNF.[9]
  • The soft tissue infections were first classified as either local or spreading by Smith et al.[10]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Descamps V, Aitken J, Lee MG (1994). "Hippocrates on necrotising fasciitis". Lancet. 344 (8921): 556. PMID 7914656.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Hasham S, Matteucci P, Stanley PR, Hart NB (2005). "Necrotising fasciitis". BMJ. 330 (7495): 830–3. doi:10.1136/bmj.330.7495.830. PMC 556077. PMID 15817551.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 WILSON B (1952). "Necrotizing fasciitis". Am Surg. 18 (4): 416–31. PMID 14915014.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Janevicius RV, Hann SE, Batt MD (1982). "Necrotizing fasciitis". Surg Gynecol Obstet. 154 (1): 97–102. PMID 7031943.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Sadasivan J, Maroju NK, Balasubramaniam A (2013). "Necrotizing fasciitis". Indian J Plast Surg. 46 (3): 472–8. doi:10.4103/0970-0358.121978. PMC 3897089. PMID 24459334.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Chennamsetty A, Khourdaji I, Burks F, Killinger KA (2015). "Corary diagnosis and management of Fournier's gangrene". Ther Adv Urol. 7 (4): 203–15. doi:10.1177/1756287215584740. PMC 4580094. PMID 26445600.
  7. Quirk WF, Sternbach G (1996). "Joseph Jones: infection with flesh eating bacteria". J Emerg Med. 14 (6): 747–53. PMID 8969999.
  8. Krieg A, Röhrborn A, Schulte Am Esch J, Schubert D, Poll LW, Ohmann C; et al. (2009). "Necrotizing fasciitis: microbiological characteristics and predictors of postoperative outcome". Eur J Med Res. 14 (1): 30–6. PMC 3352202. PMID 19258208.
  9. Stevens DL (1995). "Streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome: spectrum of disease, pathogenesis, and new concepts in treatment". Emerg Infect Dis. 1 (3): 69–78. doi:10.3201/eid0103.950301. PMC 2626872. PMID 8903167.
  10. Smith AJ, Daniels T, Bohnen JM (1996). "Soft tissue infections and the diabetic foot". Am J Surg. 172 (6A): 7S–12S. PMID 9003684.

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