Familial mediterranean fever epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sahar Memar Montazerin, M.D.[2]

Overview

The incidence of familial mediterranean fever is estimated 100 per 100,000 individuals worldwide. The prevalence of familial mediterranean fever differs widely according to the geographic area. In the non- Ashkenazi Jews, it ranges from 100 to 400 per 100,000 individuals. Patients of all age groups may develop the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). However, it usually manifests during childhood. This disorder usually affects individuals of the Turkish, Armenian, Jewish and Arabic communities. However, it is also common among western societies such as Italy, Greece, Crete, France, and Germany.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence

Prevalence

  • The prevalence of familial mediterranean fever differs widely according to geographic area.
  • In the non- Ashkenazi Jews, it ranges from 100 to 400 per 100,000 individuals.[2]
  • In Turkey, it ranges from 93 to 253 per 100,000 individuals.[3]

Age

  • Patients of all age groups may develop the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). However, it usually manifests during childhood.[4]
  • 90% of the individuals present the symptoms before the age of 20 years.
  • Only 1% of individuals present the first symptoms after the 40 years of age.[5] However, this may vary according to the geographical area of the study.[6]

Race

  • FMF usually affects individuals of the Turkish, Armenian, Jewish and Arabic communities.[7]

Gender

  • FMF affects men and women equally. However, recent studies showed a slight male preponderance.[8]

Region

  • The majority of FMF cases are reported among the nations of the Mediterranean region.[7]
  • This disorder is most commonly seen in Turkey, followed by Armenia.[9][10]
  • Among western countries, Italy has one of the highest prevalence of FMF.[11]
  • FMF cases has also been reported in in other Mediterranean countries like Greece, Crete, France, and Germany.[7]

References

  1. Ben-Chetrit, Eldad; Touitou, Isabelle (2009). "Familial Mediterranean Fever in the World". Arthritis & Rheumatism. 61 (10): 1447–1453. doi:10.1002/art.24458. ISSN 0004-3591.
  2. Daniels, M.; Shohat, T.; Brenner-Ullman, A.; Shohat, M. (1995). "Familial Mediterranean fever: High gene frequency among the non-Ashkenazic and ashkenazic Jewish populations in Israel". American Journal of Medical Genetics. 55 (3): 311–314. doi:10.1002/ajmg.1320550313. ISSN 0148-7299.
  3. Ozen S, Karaaslan Y, Ozdemir O, Saatci U, Bakkaloglu A, Koroglu E, Tezcan S (December 1998). "Prevalence of juvenile chronic arthritis and familial Mediterranean fever in Turkey: a field study". J. Rheumatol. 25 (12): 2445–9. PMID 9858443.
  4. Kallinich, Tilmann; Aktay, Nuray; Ozen, Seza (2015). "Special Aspects of Familial Mediterranean Fever in Childhood". 3: 31–45. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-14615-7_3. ISSN 2282-6505.
  5. Tamir N, Langevitz P, Zemer D, Pras E, Shinar Y, Padeh S, Zaks N, Pras M, Livneh A (November 1999). "Late-onset familial Mediterranean fever (FMF): a subset with distinct clinical, demographic, and molecular genetic characteristics". Am. J. Med. Genet. 87 (1): 30–5. PMID 10528243.
  6. Kishida D, Yazaki M, Nakamura A, Tsuchiya-Suzuki A, Shimojima Y, Sekijima Y (May 2019). "Late-onset familial Mediterranean fever in Japan". Mod Rheumatol: 1–11. doi:10.1080/14397595.2019.1621440. PMID 31116049.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Cerrito, Lucia; Sicignano, Ludovico Luca; Verrecchia, Elena; Manna, Raffaele (2015). "Epidemiology of FMF Worldwide". 3: 81–90. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-14615-7_5. ISSN 2282-6505.
  8. Tunca M, Akar S, Onen F, Ozdogan H, Kasapcopur O, Yalcinkaya F, Tutar E, Ozen S, Topaloglu R, Yilmaz E, Arici M, Bakkaloglu A, Besbas N, Akpolat T, Dinc A, Erken E (January 2005). "Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) in Turkey: results of a nationwide multicenter study". Medicine (Baltimore). 84 (1): 1–11. PMID 15643295.
  9. Kisacik B, Yildirim B, Tasliyurt T, Ozyurt H, Ozyurt B, Yuce S, Kaya S, Ertenli I, Kiraz S (September 2009). "Increased frequency of familial Mediterranean fever in northern Turkey: a population-based study". Rheumatol. Int. 29 (11): 1307–9. doi:10.1007/s00296-009-0849-z. PMID 19152093.
  10. Sarkisian T, Ajrapetian H, Beglarian A, Shahsuvarian G, Egiazarian A (March 2008). "Familial Mediterranean Fever in Armenian population". Georgian Med News (156): 105–11. PMID 18403822.
  11. La Regina, Micaela; Nucera, Gabriella; Diaco, Marialuisa; Procopio, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Notarnicola, Cecile; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Touitou, Isabelle; Manna, Raffaele (2003). "Familial Mediterranean fever is no longer a rare disease in Italy". European Journal of Human Genetics. 11 (1): 50–56. doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200916. ISSN 1018-4813.



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