Ascites laboratory findings

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Eiman Ghaffarpasand, M.D. [2]

Overview[edit]

The only diagnostic laboratory finding associated with ascites is serum-ascites albumin gradient (SAAG). SAAG is defined as the difference between albumin level in serum and ascites. Other diagnostic laboratory findings may reveal the underlying causes of ascites. Cirrhosis, as the most common cause of ascites, reveals elevated liver enzymes, creatinine, international normalized ratio (INR) along with decreased albumin, platelet count, hemoglobin (anemia), and white blood cell (WBC) count.

Laboratory Findings[edit]

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    • SAAG is defined as the difference between albumin level in serum and ascites.<ref>Runyon BA, Montano AA, Akriviadis EA, Antillon MR, Irving MA, McHutchison JG. The serum-ascites albumin gradient is superior to the exudate-transudate concept in the differential diagnosis of ascites. Ann Intern Med 1992;117:215-20. PMID 1616215.</ref>
  • Other diagnostic laboratory findings may reveal the underlying causes of ascites.<ref name="OTM">Warrell DA, Cox TN, Firth JD, Benz ED. Oxford textbook of medicine. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. ISBN 0-19-262922-0.</ref>

Cirrhosis[edit]

Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP)[edit]

Chylous ascites[edit]

References[edit]

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