Anxiety physical examination

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Vindhya BellamKonda, M.B.B.S [2]

Overview

The diagnosis of anxiety is mostly clinical, based on a thorough history and physical exam. Some of the physical exam findings in anxiety are tremor, tachycardia, twitches, sweating, restlessness.

Physical examination

[2]

Appearance of the patient

HEENT

Extremities

Respiratory

Cardiovascular

Musculoskeletal

Central nervous system

Mental status examination

Complete mental status examination should be obtained for each patient with anxiety symptoms, assessing appearance, behavior, ability to cooperate with the exam, level of activity, speech, mood and affect, thought processes and content, insight, and judgment. Patients are generally oriented times 3 and cooperative. Mood may be normal or depressed. Affect is often preserved. Psychotic symptoms are not typical of uncomplicated anxiety disorders. Suicidal ideation should be assessed by asking about passive thoughts of death, desires to be dead, thoughts of harming self, or plans or acts to harm self. Homicidal ideation is uncommon. Cognition is typically intact with no impairment in memory, language, or speech. Insight and judgment are typically intact.

References

  1. de Alencar NA, Leão CS, Leão A, Luiz RR, Fonseca-Gonçalves A, Maia LC (2017). "Sleep Bruxism and Anxiety Impacts in Quality of Life Related to Oral Health of Brazilian Children and their Families". J Clin Pediatr Dent. 41 (3): 179–185. doi:10.17796/1053-4628-41.3.179. PMID 28422599. Vancouver style error: initials (help)
  2. Palacios-Ceña M, Castaldo M, Wang K, Catena A, Torelli P, Arendt-Nielsen L, Fernández-de-Las-Peñas C (2017). "Relationship of active trigger points with related disability and anxiety in people with tension-type headache". Medicine (Baltimore). 96 (13): e6548. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000006548. PMC 5380302. PMID 28353618.

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