Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung surgery

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Maria Fernanda Villarreal, M.D. [2]

Overview

Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Common surgical procedures for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, include: pulmonary lobectomy, pneumonectomy, lung resection with lobectomy, lung resection with pneumonectomy with or without lymph node dissection. The preferred surgical procedure is thoracotomy with removal of the entire lung or lobe (lobectomy) along with regional lymph nodes and contiguous structures. Common complications of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung surgery, include: atelectasis, nosocomial pneumonia, prolonged mechanical ventilation, respiratory failure, bronchospasm, pulmonary embolism.

Surgery

  • Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung[1]
  • Common surgical procedures for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, include:
  • The feasibility of surgery depends on the stage of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung at diagnosis
  • Surgical intervention is not recommended for the management of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

Indications

Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung is usually reserved for patients with the following characteristics:[2]

  • Pulmonary function testing
  • Preoperative assessment of FEV1/DLCO
  • FEV1 >2 L (or more than 80%)
  • DLCO > 80
  • Exercise testing
  • Successful cutoff of 22 m on the stair climbing test
  • Fitness for surgery

Contraindications

Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung surgery is usually contraindicated in patients with the following characteristics:

  • Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung extension past the diaphragm
  • Involvement of contralateral hemithorax
  • Invasion to structures of the mediastinum
  • Involvement of the main pulmonary artery

Complications

Common complications of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung surgery, include:[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Smetana GW, Lawrence VA, Cornell JE (2006). "Preoperative pulmonary risk stratification for noncardiothoracic surgery: systematic review for the American College of Physicians". Ann. Intern. Med. 144 (8): 581–95. PMID 16618956. 
  2. von Groote-Bidlingmaier F, Koegelenberg CF, Bolliger CT (2011). "Functional evaluation before lung resection". Clin. Chest Med. 32 (4): 773–82. PMID 22054885. doi:10.1016/j.ccm.2011.08.001. 

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