Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Shanshan Cen, M.D. [2] Maria Fernanda Villarreal, M.D. [3]

Overview

Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung accounts for 30% to 35% of all lung cancers. It is the second most commonly encountered lung cancer after lung adenocarcinoma.[1] Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung accounts for approximately 27% of all cancer deaths. The incidence of lung squamous-cell carcinoma increases with age; the median age at diagnosis is approximately 70 years (usually ranging from 65 to 74 years).[2] Males are more commonly affected with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung than females. The male to female ratio is approximately 1.8 to 1. Black race has a higher incidence of squamous cell lung carcinoma compared with White race.[1]

Epidemiology and Demographics

Prevalence

  • Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung is the second most common non-small cell lung cancer subtype in the United States.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung accounts for 30% to 35% of all lung cancers.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of the lung accounts for approximately 27% of all cancer deaths.[1]
  • The overall mortality from lung cancer (NSCLC and SCLC combined) in the United States in 2018 is 47.14 per 100,000 individuals.[3]

Incidence

  • The annual incidence rate of lung squamous cell carcinoma is 14.4 per 100,000 individuals.
  • The relative incidence rate of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung appears to be decreasing, compared to previous years.[1]
  • The overall incidence of lung cancer (NSCLC and SCLC combined) in the United States in 2018 is 71.629 per 100,000 individuals.[4]

Age

Gender

  • Males are more commonly affected with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung than females. The male to female ratio is approximately 1.8 to 1.

Race

  • Black race has a higher incidence of squamous cell lung carcinoma compared with White race.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Meza R, Meernik C, Jeon J, Cote ML (2015). "Lung cancer incidence trends by gender, race and histology in the United States, 1973-2010". PLoS ONE. 10 (3): e0121323. PMC 4379166Freely accessible. PMID 25822850. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0121323. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Subramanian J, Morgensztern D, Goodgame B, Baggstrom MQ, Gao F, Piccirillo J, Govindan R (2010). "Distinctive characteristics of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the young: a surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) analysis". J Thorac Oncol. 5 (1): 23–8. PMID 19934774. doi:10.1097/JTO.0b013e3181c41e8d. 
  3. American Cancer Society: Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. Atlanta, Ga: American Cancer Society, 2018. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/annual-cancer-facts-and-figures/2018/cancer-facts-and-figures-2018.pdf Exit Disclaimer. Last accessed January 5, 2018.
  4. American Cancer Society: Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. Atlanta, Ga: American Cancer Society, 2018. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/annual-cancer-facts-and-figures/2018/cancer-facts-and-figures-2018.pdf Exit Disclaimer. Last accessed January 5, 2018.

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