Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics

Jump to: navigation, search

Ameloblastoma Microchapters

Home

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Ameloblastoma from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography and Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics

CDC on Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics

Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics in the news

Blogs on Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics

Directions to Hospitals Treating Ameloblastoma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Ameloblastoma epidemiology and demographics

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Simrat Sarai, M.D. [2], Vamsikrishna Gunnam M.B.B.S[3]

Overview

The incidence of ameloblastoma is approximately 1.96, 1.20, 0.18, and 0.44 per 100,000 for black males, black females, white males, and white females respectively, worldwide. Ameloblastoma affects men and women equally. There is no racial predilection to the ameloblastoma. Ameloblastoma usually occur in middle age group i.e. 20-40 years; the median age at diagnosis is 39 years.

Epidemiology and Demographics

Incidence

  • The incidence of ameloblastoma is approximately 0.5 new cases in 1,000,000 people, worldwide.[1]

Gender

  • Ameloblastoma affects men and women almost equally. Although, women tend to be 4 years younger than men when tumors first occur and tumors appear to be larger in females.[2]
  • The male to female ratio is approximately 1.2:1.[3]

Race

  • There is no racial predilection to the ameloblastoma. However, there is conflicting evidence on the incidence rates in different races.
  • Although some reports claim an increased incidence of ameloblastoma in black individuals, a large study identifies Asians as the population with greatest number of affected patients.
  • Ameloblastoma is by far the most common unequivocal odontogenic neoplasm in all ethnic groups, representing approximately 1% of head and neck neoplasms in Europe and the USA, some studies claim that it has the highest incidence in Afro-Caribbean populations.[4]

Age

  • Ameloblastoma commonly affects adults than younger people, the median age at diagnosis is 39 years.
  • They are slow growing and tend to present in the 3rd to 5th decades of life.
  • Maxillary and extraosseous ameloblastoma commonly affects individuals in a slightly older age group while unicystic and granular cell ameloblastoma occur in a younger age group.
  • The average age of unicystic ameloblastoma is 10.8 years.

Region


References

  1. Kreppel, M; Zöller, J (2018). "Ameloblastoma-Clinical, radiological, and therapeutic findings". Oral Diseases. 24 (1–2): 63–66. doi:10.1111/odi.12702. ISSN 1354-523X.
  2. Toledo-Pereyra LH, Bergren CT (1987). "Liver preservation techniques for transplantation". Artif Organs. 11 (3): 214–23. PMID 3304226.
  3. Kreppel, M; Zöller, J (2018). "Ameloblastoma-Clinical, radiological, and therapeutic findings". Oral Diseases. 24 (1–2): 63–66. doi:10.1111/odi.12702. ISSN 1354-523X.
  4. Morgan, Peter R. (2011). "Odontogenic tumors: a review". Periodontology 2000. 57 (1): 160–176. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0757.2011.00393.x. ISSN 0906-6713.
  5. Bzhalava D, Eklund C, Dillner J (February 2015). "International standardization and classification of human papillomavirus types". Virology. 476: 341–344. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2014.12.028. PMID 25577151.
  6. Lu Y, Xuan M, Takata T, Wang C, He Z, Zhou Z, Mock D, Nikai H (December 1998). "Odontogenic tumors. A demographic study of 759 cases in a Chinese population". Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 86 (6): 707–14. PMID 9868729.

Linked-in.jpg