Patent foramen ovale historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ifeoma Odukwe, M.D. [2], Priyamvada Singh, M.B.B.S. [3]; Kristin Feeney, B.S. [4]

Overview

The first anatomic description of patent foramen ovale was made by Leonardo da Vinci. He described it as a perforating channel from the left to the right chamber. Julius Friedrich Cohnheim first described the association between patent foramen ovale and stroke.

Historical Perspective

  • In 1513, Leonardo da Vinci made the first anatomic description of patent foramen ovale. He wrote this in his notes: "I found from the left chamber to the right chamber a perforating channel, which I note here to see whether this occurs in other auricle (atria) of other hearts".[1]
  • In 1564, the presence of foramen ovale at birth was first described by an Italian surgeon named Leonardi Botali.[2]
  • In 1877, Julius Friedrich Cohnheim, a German pathologist, first described the association between patent foramen ovale and stroke. This was based on a report he made from an autopsy he performed on a 35-year old woman who had a fatal stroke. He found a long thrombus in the lower extremity and a foramen ovale. He wrote in his report "I found a very large foramen ovale through which I could pass three fingers with ease. Now I could no longer ignore the fact that a torn-off piece of thrombus arising from the V. curalis, while traveling through the heart, passed out of the right atrium into the left atrium and to the A. Foss. Sylvii."[3][4]

References

  1. Rigatelli, Gianluca; Zuin, Marco (2016). "Leonardo da Vinci and patent foramen ovale: An historical perspective". International Journal of Cardiology. 222: 826. doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.08.079. ISSN 0167-5273.
  2. Morjaria R, Tsaloumas M, Shah P (2015). "An unusual presentation of patent foramen ovale". JRSM Open. 6 (8): 2054270415596320. doi:10.1177/2054270415596320. PMC 4562378. PMID 26380102.
  3. Lippmann H, Rafferty T (1993). "Patent foramen ovale and paradoxical embolization: a historical perspective". Yale J Biol Med. 66 (1): 11–7. PMC 2588833. PMID 8256459.
  4. Collado, Fareed Moses S.; Poulin, Marie‐France; Murphy, Joshua J.; Jneid, Hani; Kavinsky, Clifford J. (2018). "Patent Foramen Ovale Closure for Stroke Prevention and Other Disorders". Journal of the American Heart Association. 7 (12). doi:10.1161/JAHA.117.007146. ISSN 2047-9980.



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