Oral candidiasis medical therapy

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Ahmed Younes M.B.B.CH [2]

Overview

Oral candidiasis can be treated with topical anti-fungal drugs, such as nystatin (mycostatin), miconazole or amphotericin B. Patients who are immunocompromised, either with HIV/AIDS or as a result of chemotherapy, may require systemic treatment with oral or intravenous administered antifungals.

Medical Therapy

Any underlying cause, such as poor glucose control in diabetics, should be addressed. Oral candidiasis can be treated with topical anti-fungal drugs, such as nystatin (mycostatin), miconazole or amphotericin B. Patients who are immunocompromised, either with HIV/AIDS or as a result of chemotherapy, may require systemic treatment with oral or intravenous administered antifungals.

Oral candidiasis usually responds to topical treatments such as clotrimazole troches and nystatin suspension (nystatin - swish and swallow). Systemic antifungal medication such as fluconazole or itraconazole may be necessary for oropharyngeal infections that do not respond to these treatments.

Treatment Regimen

  • Oropharyngeal candidiasis[1]
  • Medical treatment of oropharyngeal candidiais in immunocompromised patients:[1]

Most immunocompromised patients respond initially to topical agents using the same regimen above but relapses occur rapidly unless fluconazole (400 mg [6 mg/kg} daily)is not used.

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  • Treatment in Newborn:

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Pappas PG, Kauffman CA, Andes D, Benjamin DK, Calandra TF, Edwards JE; et al. (2009). "Clinical practice guidelines for the management of candidiasis: 2009 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America". Clin Infect Dis. 48 (5): 503–35. doi:10.1086/596757. PMID 19191635.

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