Nucleic acid amplification technique

Jump to: navigation, search

WikiDoc Resources for Nucleic acid amplification technique

Articles

Most recent articles on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Most cited articles on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Review articles on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Articles on Nucleic acid amplification technique in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Images of Nucleic acid amplification technique

Photos of Nucleic acid amplification technique

Podcasts & MP3s on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Videos on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Bandolier on Nucleic acid amplification technique

TRIP on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Nucleic acid amplification technique at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Clinical Trials on Nucleic acid amplification technique at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Nucleic acid amplification technique

NICE Guidance on Nucleic acid amplification technique

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Nucleic acid amplification technique

CDC on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Books

Books on Nucleic acid amplification technique

News

Nucleic acid amplification technique in the news

Be alerted to news on Nucleic acid amplification technique

News trends on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Commentary

Blogs on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Definitions

Definitions of Nucleic acid amplification technique

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Discussion groups on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Patient Handouts on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Directions to Hospitals Treating Nucleic acid amplification technique

Risk calculators and risk factors for Nucleic acid amplification technique

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Nucleic acid amplification technique

Causes & Risk Factors for Nucleic acid amplification technique

Diagnostic studies for Nucleic acid amplification technique

Treatment of Nucleic acid amplification technique

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Nucleic acid amplification technique

International

Nucleic acid amplification technique en Espanol

Nucleic acid amplification technique en Francais

Business

Nucleic acid amplification technique in the Marketplace

Patents on Nucleic acid amplification technique

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Nucleic acid amplification technique

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAAT) are biochemistry and molecular biology methods that involve the in-vitro synthesis of many copies of DNA or RNA from one original template.[1]

Types of Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques (NAAT)

Ligase chain reaction

A ligase chain reaction is a DNA amplification technique based upon the ligation of oligonucleotide probes. The probes are designed to exactly match two adjacent sequences of a specific target DNA. The chain reaction is repeated in three steps in the presence of excess probe:

  1. Heat denaturation of double-stranded DNA
  2. Annealing of probes to target DNA
  3. Joining of the probes by thermostable DNA ligase

After the reaction is repeated for 20-30 cycles, the production of ligated probe is measured.[2]

Polymerase chain reaction

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an in vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include:

  • Thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules
  • Annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences
  • Extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase

The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.[3]

Self-sustained sequence replication

Self-sustained sequence replication is an isothermal in-vitro nucleotide amplification process. The process involves the concomitant action of an RNA-directed DNA polymerase, ribonuclease(s), and DNA-directed RNA polymerases to synthesize large quantities of sequence-specific RNA and DNA molecules.[4]

References



Linked-in.jpg