Macroangiopathy

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]



In macroangiopathy, fat and blood clots build up in the large blood vessels, stick to the vessel walls, and block the flow of blood.

The decrease of blood flow through stenosis or clot formation impair the flow of oxygen to cells and biological tissues (called ischemia) and lead to their death (necrosis and gangrene, which in turn may require amputation). Thus, tissues which are very sensitive to oxygen levels, such as the retina, develop microangiopathy and may cause blindness (so-called proliferative diabetic retinopathy). Damage to nerve cells may cause peripheral neuropathy, and to kidney cells, diabetic nephropathy (Kimmelstiel-Wilson syndrome).

Macroangiopathy, on the other hand, may cause other complications, such as ischemic heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease which contributes to the diabetic foot ulcers and the risk of amputation.

(Angiopathy is the generic term for a disease of the blood vessels (arteries, veins, and capillaries). The best known and most prevalent angiopathy is the diabetic angiopathy, a complication that may occur in chronic diabetes.

There are two types of angiopathy: macroangiopathy and microangiopathy.



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