Klinefelter's syndrome (patient information)

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Klinefelter's syndrome (patient information)
ICD-10 Q98.0-Q98.4
ICD-9 758.7
DiseasesDB 7189
MedlinePlus 000382
MeSH D007713

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Assistant Editor(s)-In-Chief: Alexandra M. Palmer

Overview

Klinefelter's syndrome is the presence of an extra X chromosome in a male.

What are the symptoms of Klinefelter's syndrome?

The most common symptom is infertility. Other symptoms may include:

What are the causes of Klinefelter's syndrome?

Humans have 46 chromosomes. Chromosomes contain all of your genes and DNA, the building blocks of the body. The two sex chromosomes determine if you become a boy or a girl. Females normally have two of the same sex chromosomes, written as XX. Males normally have an X and a Y chromosome (written as XY).

Klinefelter's syndrome is one of a group of sex chromosome problems. It results in males who have at least one extra X chromosome. Usually, this occurs due to one extra X (written as XXY).

Klinefelter's syndrome is found in about 1 out of every 500 - 1,000 newborn males. Women who have pregnancies after age 35 are slightly more likely to have a boy with this syndrome than younger women.

Who is at highest risk?

Klinefelter's syndrome is a genetic disorder, so anyone with a family history of the syndrome is at risk.

When to seek urgent medical care?

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if a boy does not develop secondary sexual characteristics at puberty.

A genetics counselor can provide information about this condition, and help explain abnormal chromosome findings and possible complications. The counselor will also be familiar with local and national support groups.

An endocrinologist and infertility specialist may also be helpful.

Diagnosis

Adults may come to the doctor because of infertility. School-age children may be brought in to because of learning problems.

The following tests may be performed:

Treatment options

Testosterone therapy may be prescribed. This can help:

Most men with this syndrome are not able to father children. However, some men have been able to have children. An infertility specialist may be able to help.

Where to find medical care for Klinefelter's syndrome?

Directions to Hospitals Treating Klinefelter's syndrome

What to expect (Outlook/Prognosis)?

Most patients have a normal, productive life.

Possible complications

The syndrome increases the risk of:

Enlarged teeth with a thinning surface (taurodontism) is very common in Klinefelter's syndrome. It can be diagnosed by dental x-rays.

Source

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000382.htm


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