Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Jump to: navigation, search

WikiDoc Resources for Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Articles

Most recent articles on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Most cited articles on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Review articles on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Articles on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Images of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Photos of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Podcasts & MP3s on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Videos on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Bandolier on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

TRIP on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Clinical Trials on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

NICE Guidance on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

CDC on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Books

Books on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

News

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist in the news

Be alerted to news on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

News trends on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Commentary

Blogs on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Definitions

Definitions of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Discussion groups on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Patient Handouts on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Directions to Hospitals Treating Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Risk calculators and risk factors for Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Causes & Risk Factors for Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Diagnostic studies for Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Treatment of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

International

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist en Espanol

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist en Francais

Business

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist in the Marketplace

Patents on Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist


Overview

A gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH antagonist) is a synthetic peptide that competes with the neurohormone GnRH for its receptor, thus decreasing or blocking GnRH action. As a result endogenous pituitary output of FSH and LH is shut down.

GnRH antagonists are also derivatives of the natural GnRH decapeptide with multiple amino acid substitutions. These substitutions modify the agent so that it blocks the receptor and decreases FSH and LH secretions within hours. In contrast to GnRH agonists, antagonists have no flare effect, thus their therapeutic effect is immediately apparent. However, there action is short-lived and daily injections are necessary to maintain their effect. Typically endogenous FSH and LH activity returns about 40 hours after cessation of GnRH antagonist administration, although with a higher dose the return to normal pituitary function will be postponed for longer. Unlike the GnRH agonists, long acting or depot forms of the agent are not currently available, thus GnRH antagonists are not used in the long term therapy of patients with cancer where hormone levels need to be kept low for a long time. As of 2006, Histrelin (as Supprelin-LA) is awaiting approval for use as a 12-month depot injection.

The main application of GnRH antagonists is currently short term use in the prevention of endogenous ovulation in patients who undergo exogenous stimulation with FSH in the preparation for IVF. Typically they are administered in the mid- to late follicular phase in stimulated cycles prior to the administration of hCG. Because they decrease luteal competence, patients are usually given some form of luteal support after egg retrieval.

GnRH antagonists for long term use are under investigation (i.e. abarelix), their advantage over GnRH agonist would be that they lack the initial flare stimulation and induce quickly a hypogonadal situation.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications are used by as injectables:

  1. Abarelix (Plenaxis®)
  2. Cetrorelix (Cetrotide®), by Serono
  3. Ganirelix (Antagon®), by Organon International.

GnRH antagonists are pregnancy category X agents.

See also

External links



Linked-in.jpg