Emergency contraception

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Emergency contraception Microchapters

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Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Emergency Contraceptive Pills
Intrauterine Devices

Mechanism of Action

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Emergency contraception from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Cultural Aspects

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Emergency contraception On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

[1]

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Emergency contraception

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X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA onEmergency contraception

CDC on Emergency contraception

contraception in the news

Blogs on Emergency contraception

Directions to Hospitals Treating Emergency contraception

Risk calculators and risk factors for Emergency contraception

Editor(s)-in-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S.,M.D. [2] Phone:617-632-7753; Angela Botts, M.D., Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Geriatric Medicine [3]


Emergency contraception
Background
B.C. type Hormonal (progestin or others) or intra-uterine
First use 1970s
Failure rates (per use)
Perfect use ECP: see article text
IUD: under 1%
Typical use ?%
Usage
User reminders Pregnancy test required if no period seen after 3 weeks
Clinic review Recommended to consider need screen STDs or consider ongoing routine contraceptive options
Advantages and Disadvantages
STD protection No
Periods ECP may disrupt next menstrual period by couple days. IUDs may make menstruation heavier and more painful
Benefits IUDs may be subsequently left in place for ongoing contraception
Risks As per methods
Medical notes
Combined estrogrogen/progestin pills of Yuzpe regimen now superseded by better tolerated and more effective progestin-only pill.
ECP licensed for use within 3 days of unprotected intercourse and IUDs within 5 days.

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Mechanism of Action

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Emergency contraception from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Cultural Aspects

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms | Physical Examination | Other Imaging Findings | Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy | Surgery | Primary Prevention | Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy | Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

External Links

  • The Morning-After Pill Conspiracy – A United States group whose goal is to have Plan B available over the counter (not just behind pharmacy counters) to women of all ages.