Dermatographic urticaria

Jump to: navigation, search
Dermatographic urticaria
Dermatographic urticaria.jpg
Dermatographic urticaria is sometimes called "skin writing".
ICD-10 L50.3
ICD-9 708.3
OMIM 125635
DiseasesDB 12736
eMedicine derm/446 

WikiDoc Resources for Dermatographic urticaria

Articles

Most recent articles on Dermatographic urticaria

Most cited articles on Dermatographic urticaria

Review articles on Dermatographic urticaria

Articles on Dermatographic urticaria in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ

Media

Powerpoint slides on Dermatographic urticaria

Images of Dermatographic urticaria

Photos of Dermatographic urticaria

Podcasts & MP3s on Dermatographic urticaria

Videos on Dermatographic urticaria

Evidence Based Medicine

Cochrane Collaboration on Dermatographic urticaria

Bandolier on Dermatographic urticaria

TRIP on Dermatographic urticaria

Clinical Trials

Ongoing Trials on Dermatographic urticaria at Clinical Trials.gov

Trial results on Dermatographic urticaria

Clinical Trials on Dermatographic urticaria at Google

Guidelines / Policies / Govt

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse on Dermatographic urticaria

NICE Guidance on Dermatographic urticaria

NHS PRODIGY Guidance

FDA on Dermatographic urticaria

CDC on Dermatographic urticaria

Books

Books on Dermatographic urticaria

News

Dermatographic urticaria in the news

Be alerted to news on Dermatographic urticaria

News trends on Dermatographic urticaria

Commentary

Blogs on Dermatographic urticaria

Definitions

Definitions of Dermatographic urticaria

Patient Resources / Community

Patient resources on Dermatographic urticaria

Discussion groups on Dermatographic urticaria

Patient Handouts on Dermatographic urticaria

Directions to Hospitals Treating Dermatographic urticaria

Risk calculators and risk factors for Dermatographic urticaria

Healthcare Provider Resources

Symptoms of Dermatographic urticaria

Causes & Risk Factors for Dermatographic urticaria

Diagnostic studies for Dermatographic urticaria

Treatment of Dermatographic urticaria

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

CME Programs on Dermatographic urticaria

International

Dermatographic urticaria en Espanol

Dermatographic urticaria en Francais

Business

Dermatographic urticaria in the Marketplace

Patents on Dermatographic urticaria

Experimental / Informatics

List of terms related to Dermatographic urticaria

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1];Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Kiran Singh, M.D. [2]


Overview

Dermatographic urticaria (also known as dermographism, dermatographism or "skin writing") is a skin disorder seen in 4-5% of the population[1], in which the skin becomes raised and inflamed when stroked or rubbed with a dull object[2]. The symptoms are thought to be caused by mast cells in the surface of the skin releasing histamines without the presence of antigens, due to the presence of a weak membrane surrounding the mast cells. The histamines released cause the skin to swell in the affected areas.

This weak membrane easily and rapidly breaks down under physical pressure causing an allergic-like reaction, generally a red welt to appear on the skin. It can often be confused with an allergic reaction to the object causing a scratch, when in fact it is the act of being scratched that causes a welt to appear. These welts are a subset of hives that appear within minutes, accompanied by a sensation of burning, and/or itchiness. The first outbreak of hives can lead to others on body parts not directly stimulated, scraped or scratched. In a normal case the swelling has reduced itself with no treatment within 15-30 minutes, but in extreme cases, itchy red wheals may last anwhere from a few hours to days.

Dermatographism can be caused by stress, tight or abrasive clothing, watches, glasses, energetic kissing, heat, cold, or anything that causes stress to the skin. In many cases it is merely a minor annoyance, but in some rare cases symptoms are severe enough to impact a patient's life.

It can be treated by antihistamines or cromoglicate, as they prevent the histamine from causing the reaction. The underlying cause of dermographism is not known, and can last for many years without relief. 95% of chronic cases are never solved. Sometimes the condition goes away, sometimes it stays forever. It is not a life threatening disease.

Diagnosis

Physical Examination

Skin

Extremities
Trunk

References

  1. Jedele, KB; Michels, VV (1991), "Familial dermographism", American Journal of Medical Genetics, 39 (2): 201–3 PMID 2063925
  2. Kontoi-Fili K., Borici-Mazi R., Kapp A., et al. "Physical urticaria: classification and diagnostic guidelines." An EACCI position paper. Allergy 1997;52:504–13.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 "Dermatology Atlas".

External links



bg:Дермографизъм nl:Dermografie