Cryptococcosis CT

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aravind Kuchkuntla, M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

The most common CT findings in patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis are pulmonary nodules and pulmonary opacities that range from a perihilar interstitial pattern to an area of dense alveolar consolidation.

CT scan

The most common CT scan findings in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis are pulmonary nodules.[1][2]

  • The nodules are most often multiple, smaller than 10 mm in diameter, and have well defined smooth margins.
  • The nodules usually involve less than 10% of the parenchyma and tend to be distributed peripherally in the middle and upper zones.
Cavitary nodule in right lung, source: radiopedia.org


References

  1. Hu Z, Xu C, Wei H, Zhong Y, Bo C, Chi Y; et al. (2013). "Solitary cavitary pulmonary nodule may be a common CT finding in AIDS-associated pulmonary cryptococcosis". Scand J Infect Dis. 45 (5): 378–89. doi:10.3109/00365548.2012.749422. PMID 23244589.
  2. Sider L, Westcott MA (1994). "Pulmonary manifestations of cryptococcosis in patients with AIDS: CT features". J Thorac Imaging. 9 (2): 78–84. PMID 8207784.

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