Conventional insulinotherapy

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Diabetes mellitus Main page

Patient Information

Type 1
Type 2

Overview

Classification

Diabetes mellitus type 1
Diabetes mellitus type 2
Gestational diabetes

Differential Diagnosis

Complications

Screening

Diagnosis

Prevention

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

Diabetes mellitus
Types of Diabetes
Diabetes mellitus type 1
Diabetes mellitus type 2
Gestational diabetes

Pre-diabetes:
Impaired fasting glycaemia
Impaired glucose tolerance

Disease Management
Diabetes management:
Diabetic diet
Anti-diabetic drugs
Conventional insulinotherapy
Intensive insulinotherapy
Other Concerns
Cardiovascular disease

Diabetic comas:
Diabetic hypoglycemia
Diabetic ketoacidosis
Nonketotic hyperosmolar

Diabetic myonecrosis
Diabetic nephropathy
Diabetic neuropathy
Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetes and pregnancy

Blood tests
Blood sugar
Fructosamine
Glucose tolerance test
Glycosylated hemoglobin

Conventional insulinotherapy is a therapeutic regimen for diabetes mellitus treatment. It can be contrasted with intensive insulinotherapy. This is an older method that is still in use in a proportion of cases. Insulin injections of a mixture of rapid and intermediate acting Insulin are performed once or twice daily. Frequent estimations of blood glucose is not required. The down side of this method is the fact that it is difficult to achieve as good results of glycemic control as with intensive insulinotherapy.

References


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