Chronic cholecystitis epidemiology and demographics

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] ; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Furqan M M. M.B.B.S[2], Aditya Govindavarjhulla, M.B.B.S. [3]

Overview

It is estimated that 20 to 25 million Americans (10%–15% of the population) have gallstones. However, only 1-4% experience symptomatic gallstone diseases. Gallstone disease usually affects individuals of the North American Indian race. Females are more commonly affected by acute cholecystitis than males. Acute cholecystitis cases are reported worldwide. Acute cholecystitis accounts for 700,000 cholecystectomies and costs of ∼$6.5 billion annually only in the United States. Females are more commonly affected by gallstone diseases than males for calculous cholecystitis. Males are at increased risk compared to females for acalculous cholecystitis following trauma and burns.

Epidemiology and Demographics

The epidemiology and demographics of chronic cholecystitis is given bellow:

Prevalence

  • It is estimated that 20 to 25 million Americans (10%–15% of the population) have gallstones. However, only 1000 to 4000 per 100, 000 (1-4%) individuals experience symptomatic gallstone diseases.[1][2][3][4]
  • It is estimated that 12000 to 13000 (12% to 13%) per 100,000 individuals with chronic cholecystitis have no demonstrable stones.[1]

Age

  • The risk of gallstone diseases increases with age.[5]

Race

  • Gallstone diseases usually affects individuals of the North American Indian race. White Americans, Asians, African Americans, and Africans are less likely to develop acute cholecystitis.[2][6]

Gender

  • Females are more commonly affected by gallstone diseases than males for calculous cholecystitis.[2][6]
  • Males are at increased risk compared to females for acalculous cholecystitis following trauma and burns.[7]

Region

Gallstone diseases are comparatively less prevalent in the developing countries.[2]

Developed Countries

  • Gallstone disease accounts for 700,000 cholecystectomies and costs of ∼$6.5 billion annually only in the United States.[2]
    • Gallstone disease is prevalent in North America with a racial predisposition to the American Indians.
    • South American countries have slightly more prevalence than North America.
    • In Europe, Scandinavian countries have the highest prevalence of acute cholecystitis.
    • Italy, Austria, England, Germany, and Poland have a higher prevalence among the rest of Europe.

Developing Countries

  • Gallstone diseases are comparatively less prevalent in the developing countries.[2]
    • India and Taiwan have a higher prevalence of acute cholecystitis in the developing countries.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Cholecystitis - ScienceDirect".
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Shaffer EA (2006). "Gallstone disease: Epidemiology of gallbladder stone disease". Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 20 (6): 981–96. doi:10.1016/j.bpg.2006.05.004. PMID 17127183.
  3. "Redirecting".
  4. "www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-08-20.
  5. "www-sciencedirect-com.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu".
  6. 6.0 6.1 Knab LM, Boller AM, Mahvi DM (2014). "Cholecystitis". Surg. Clin. North Am. 94 (2): 455–70. doi:10.1016/j.suc.2014.01.005. PMID 24679431.
  7. "Acute acalculous cholecystitis - Surgical Treatment - NCBI Bookshelf". Retrieved 2012-08-20.




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