Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview

Jump to navigation Jump to search

Bicuspid aortic stenosis Microchapters

Home

Patient Info

Overview

Anatomy

Historical Perspective

Pathophysiology

Epidemiology & Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Causes of Bicuspid aortic stenosis

Natural History, Complications & Prognosis

Diagnosis

History & Symptoms

Physical Examination

Lab Tests

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography

Cardiac Catheterization

Treatment

Overview

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview

CDC on Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview

Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview in the news

Blogs on Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview

Directions to Hospitals Treating Bicuspid aortic stenosis

Risk calculators and risk factors for Bicuspid aortic stenosis treatment overview

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Usama Talib, BSc, MD [2]

Overview

Approximately 40% of patients with a bicuspid aortic valve potentially require aortic valve replacement in the third or fourth decade of their life.

Concomitant Disease of the Aorta

The aorta of patients with bicuspid aortic valve does not have the same histological characteristics of a normal aorta. The tensile strength is reduced. These patients are at a higher risk for aortic dissection and aneurysm formation of the ascending aorta. The size of the proximal aorta should be evaluated carefully during the evaluation of the patient for aortic stenosis surgery. The initial diameter of the aorta should be noted and periodic evaluation with CT scan (every year or sooner if there is a change in aortic diameter) should be recommended. Therefore, if the patient needs surgery, the size of the aorta will determine what type of surgery should be offered to the patient. [1][2]

Associated Congenital Heart Disease

Patients with bicuspid aortic valve are also at higher risk of aortic coarctation, an abnormal narrowing of the thoracic aorta [3].

References

  1. Cohn LH, Edmunds LH Jr. Cardiac Surgery in the Adult. McGraw-Hill, 2003.
  2. C. M. Otto, I. G. Burwash, M. E. Legget, B. I. Munt, M. Fujioka, N. L. Healy, C. D. Kraft, C. Y. Miyake-Hull & R. G. Schwaegler (1997). "Prospective study of asymptomatic valvular aortic stenosis. Clinical, echocardiographic, and exercise predictors of outcome". Circulation. 95 (9): 2262–2270. PMID 9142003. Unknown parameter |month= ignored (help)
  3. Cohn LH, Edmunds LH Jr. Cardiac Surgery in the Adult. McGraw-Hill, 2003.

Template:WH Template:WS Cardiology